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CCHE Health Economics Series – November 14 @ 10AM

November 14, 2014 @ 10:00 am - 12:00 pm EST

| Free

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The Long Run Impact of Cash Transfer to Poor Families – [PDF Flyer]

As part of the Canadian Centre for Health Economics (CCHE) Friday Health Economics Series, we welcome Professor Shari Eli this Friday November 14th, 10am – 12pm in HS100 (Health Sciences Building 155 College Street). Professor Eli will explore “The Long Run Impact of Cash Transfers to Poor Families”.

Shari Eli is an assistant professor in the Economics Department at the University of Toronto. She received her Ph.D. in economics from U.C. Berkeley. Her fields of interest are Economic History, Health Economics and Economic Demography. One section of her research explores the ways in which individuals of low socioeconomic status used income to improve health status and attain higher education and earnings levels during the late 19th and early 20th century. Another section investigates the relationship between caloric needs and rising household expenditure levels in India today to resolve calorie consumption puzzles. Shari is a Faculty Associate of the Canadian Centre for Health Economics. She is also a Faculty Affiliate at the Centre for the Study of the United States at the University of Toronto.

 Abstract

We estimate the long-run impact of cash transfers to poor families on children’s longevity, educational attainment, nutritional status, and income in adulthood. To do so, we collected individual-level administrative records of applicants to the Mothers’ Pension program—the first government-sponsored welfare program in the US (1911-1935) —and matched them to census, WWII and death records. Male children of accepted applicants lived one year longer than those of rejected mothers. Male children of accepted mothers received one-third more years of schooling, were less likely to be underweight, and had higher income in adulthood than children of rejected mothers.

Link to schedule of CCHE talks: http://www.canadiancentreforhealtheconomics.ca/learn/conferences-and-seminars/cche-seminar-series/

To be added to the CCHE Health Economics seminar series mailing list please send an e-mail to: cche@utoronto.ca

Details

Date:
November 14, 2014
Time:
10:00 am - 12:00 pm EST
Cost:
Free
Event Categories:
,

Venue

Health Sciences Building, HS100
155 College Street, Room 100
Toronto, Ontario M5T3M6 Canada
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Phone:
4169784326

Organizer