NAO Lecture Series & Events

NAO Lecture Series

The NAO Lecture Series brings leading scholars and great thinkers from around the world to the University of Toronto to present their applied research on comparative health systems and policies. Of interest to health system decision-makers and managers as well as scholars and students, these NAO lectures are free of charge and open to anyone to attend.

April 28, 2020 - HealthPros: Erica Barbazza
To What Extent is EMR Data Used for Performance Measurement in Canada?

To What Extent is EMR Data Used for Performance Measurement in Canada?

European Commission-funded HealthPros doctoral fellow, Erica Barbazza, will present preliminary findings of a study exploring the current and potential use of primary health care EMR data for performance measurement across Canadian jurisdictions. The study – conducted in collaboration with the Canadian Institute for Health Information, University of Toronto and the HealthPros network – investigates current use cases of EMR data identified following a pan-Canadian scan and contextual considerations enabling quality of care uses of EMR data. The lecture will summarize key findings around the use cases explored and potential insights for jurisdictions at varied stages in optimizing EMR data for performance measurement, and discuss the implications of these findings for the information needs arising due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Erica Barbazza Profile of Erica Barbazza

Erica Barbazza is a HealthPros fellow based at the Academic Medical Centre of the University of Amsterdam. Her research is focused on the actionability of health care performance indicators exploring what makes an indicator fit for purpose and use with a focus on primary care. Originally from Toronto, she has spent the past decade abroad working for the World Health Organization in countries of central Asia and Europe. Erica completed an MSc in International Health Policy from the London School of Economics and BHSc in Health Sciences from the University of Western Ontario.    

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Lecture Slides [PDF]

March 26, 2020 - Neil Seeman
Hearing from Quiet Voices: Public Sentiments on COVID-19

Hearing from Quiet Voices: Public Sentiments on COVID-19

We were fortunate to have Neil Seeman shed valuable insight on the little studied but crucial element of overlooked public perception as it relates to the pandemic. Founder and CEO of RIWI (Realtime Interactive Worldwide Intelligence) Corp, a global trend tracking, risk monitoring and prediction technology firm, Seeman is an expert in identifying and tracking “quiet voices”, or people who are otherwise not heard from, who are disinclined to share their opinions through surveys and other means. Using a range of sophisticated and highly rigorous online information-gathering techniques, Seeman’s talk explored experiences of these quiet voices regarding various aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic, such as attitudes to hygiene and social distancing protocols, and trust In public health initiatives. Our thanks to Neil for this engaging webinar lecture, and for so quickly tailoring his presentation to the COVID-19 crisis.

Neil Seeman

Founder and Chief Executive Officer, RIWI Corp.Profile of Neil Seeman

Neil Seeman is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of RIWI Corp., a global trend-tracking, risk monitoring and prediction technology firm. His academic and commercial work seeks to collect a unique stream of individual, community-based, and country-wide sentiment data from more than 200 countries and territories in the world for organizations such as the UN World Food Programme, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the United States Agency for International Development, The World Bank, the US State Department and BofA Securities. For high-frequency, real-time public health sentiment data, Neil’s team works with leading research universities around the world, including Harvard University, Australian National University and the University of Toronto.

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February 27, 2020 - Peter Berman
The Global Movement for Universal Health Coverage by 2030: What is it and how is it going?

The Global Movement for Universal Health Coverage by 2030: What is it and how is it going?

Co-hosted by the Office of Global Public Health Education & Training

Peter will discuss what universal health coverage means in a global context, how it has been interpreted and measured, what we are learning from recent measurements, and what are the challenges facing us towards the 2030 targets.

Peter BermanProfile of Peter Bermam

Professor and Director, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia
Adjunct Professor, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University

Peter Berman is a health economist with forty years of experience in research, policy analysis and development, and training and education in global health. Prof. Berman is Professor and Director, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia in Vancouver Canada, and Adjunct Professor in Global Health at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University. Prof. Berman was the founding faculty director of Harvard Chan’s new Doctor of Public Health degree and has led several innovative research projects on developing primary care systems, strengthening service delivery, and improving health care financing mechanisms for better outcomes, with a focus on work in Ethiopia, India, and Malaysia. Prof. Berman also spent four years (2004-2011) in the World Bank’s New Delhi office as Lead Economist for Health, Nutrition, and Population, and was the founding Director of the International Health Systems Program in the Population and International Health Department at Harvard.

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December 10, 2019 - Health Pros: Damir Ivankovic & Mircha Poldrugovac
Optimizing Performance Intelligence in Health Systems: Insights from Hospital and Long-Term Care Sectors

Optimizing Performance Intelligence in Health Systems: Insights from Hospital and Long-Term Care Sectors

The NAO and IHPME are delighted to be partnering with the European Commission, Canadian Institute for Health Information and the Amsterdam University Medical Centre to host two visiting PhD students as part of the HealthPros training program.  In this NAO Lecture, we will hear from Damir Ivankovic and Mircha Poldrugovac about this unique training program, and the two empirical studies they are leading while in Toronto.

Damir has worked closely with the Ontario Hospital Association to develop a survey, currently in the field, that asks hospital managers about how they use performance data to inform their decisions. The survey was previously administered by the European Association of Hospital Managers. Damir will share the findings of the analysis of European survey data and what insights may be gained by including the Ontario case. Mircha is drawing on Canada-wide data on performance in long-term care homes from CIHI to examine the trends in performance over time, and in particular to see the extent to which public reporting led to any discernable break in that trend.

About HealthPros

HealthPros is a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network for Healthcare Performance Intelligence Professionals, running from January 2018 – 2022. HealthPros trains 13 PhD candidates (HealthPros fellows) to become the first generation of Healthcare Performance Intelligence Professionals. They are trained to make effective use of available healthcare performance data in countries to improve integrated service delivery, patient engagement, equality in access to healthcare, health outcomes, and reduce waste in healthcare. Through innovative research, HealthPros is developing tools and implementing methods to streamline healthcare performance measurement, the development and application of performance-based governance mechanisms and effective use of Healthcare Performance Intelligence by different end-users to match the different health care systems in the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany, UK, Italy, Hungary and Canada, and support the transferability of the tools and methods to other countries.

Damir Ivankovic

Profile of DamirDamir is a PhD Fellow/MD Researcher of the HealthPros Project. Prior to joining HealthPros, Damir worked as a Public Health Resident at the Croatian Institute of Public Health and the President of the European Network of Medical Residents in Public Health (EuroNet MRPH). His educational background includes public health residency, healthcare management and business administration, with professional experiences including clinical medicine (psychiatry), health policy (Ministry of Health) and medical device industry (multinational manufacturer) work.

Mircha Poldrugovac

Porfile of MirchaMircha is a PhD Fellow of the HealthPros project who began his medical career working as an advisor in the area of quality and safety in health care at the Ministry of Health of Slovenia. Mircha participated in several projects in the area of quality management, including the preparation of a national framework of quality indicators in health care and of the first annual report on those indicators. He began working at the National Institute of Public Health in Slovenia in 2011 and completed his specialist training in the area of public health in 2016. Among others, he has been recently involved in the WHO Europe lead Evidence Informed policy-making Network (EVIPNet), for which he is one of the so called “champions” in Slovenia.

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November 11, 2019 - Sir Chris Ham
Improving Population Health: What is the Role of Health Systems?

Improving Population Health: What is the Role of Health Systems?

Co-hosted by the Centre for Sustainable Health Systems

The hanging burden of disease requires health system to focus on promoting population health alongside their established role in treating illness. All parts of the health system must contribute by using resources more effectively and by recognizing the role of health systems as anchor institutions in their communities. Health systems also have a contribution to make in building partnerships for improving health with local governments, people and communities. This lecture will illustrate how this is being done in some jurisdictions and set out the challenges facing health system leaders in ‘turning around the oil tanker’.

Sir Chris Ham

Independent Chair, Coventry and Warwickshire STP, non-executive Director, Royal Free London, NHS Foundation Trust, Co-Chair of the NHS Assembly and Visiting Senior Fellow at The King’s Fund

Sir Chris Ham is an experienced leader and has served on the boards of a number of organisations in both executive and non-executive roles. His career has encompassed the charitable sector, central government and universities. He has extensive networks among national and local NHS organisations and in local government and the third sector. He is currently independent chair of the Coventry and Warwickshire STP, non-executive director of the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, co-chair of the NHS Assembly, visiting senior fellow at The King’s Fund, and independent adviser to Carnall Farrar. His portfolio includes advising NHS organisations and their partners, speaking at conferences and seminars, and writing about health policy and management in the UK and other systems.

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November 5, 2019 - Aylene Bousquat
Primary Health Care and Regionalization in Brazil

Primary Health Care and Regionalization in Brazil

Co-hosted by the Office of Global Public Health Education & Training

Situated within the context of the Sustainable Development Goals and the Astana Declaration on Primary Health Care (PHC), Aylene will discuss the political, structural and organizational dimensions of PHC in different regions of Brazil.

Aylene Bousquat

Professor, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, Brazil

Aylene Bousquat is a Professor of health policy at the School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, Brazil. She is a physician with MPH and PHD in Public Health. Her research interests include primary health care, regionalization, geography of health care and policy implementation.

September 10, 2019 - Tim Tenbensel
Tales from the South Seas - The Politics of Health Policy Reform without the Medical Veto in Aotearoa/New Zealand

Tales from the South Seas – The Politics of Health Policy Reform without the Medical Veto in Aotearoa/New Zealand

As many Canadian health policy researchers have noted, the veto power of the provincial medical associations constitutes a substantial constraint on what Canadian governments can and cannot do in health policy. So, imagine a very similar system in which this constraint is absent. In New Zealand, organised medicine has not traditionally played a strong formal role in health policy processes. There are many recent examples of major policy change in NZ in which organised medicine did not play a large role in formulation, and could not block the features of the policy that may have adverse implications for their constituents. In this context, it is worth asking whether New Zealand has had any more success in advancing health policy projects such as primary care reform that may be unsettling for medical interests.

In this seminar, Tenbensel will explore the story of New Zealand’s primary care reforms since 2001 – its successes and its unfulfilled expectations, its effects on medical and other health professions, and the lessons from this experience that may be applicable to other jurisdictions. The New Zealand primary health care reform story is one that clearly demonstrates the importance of implementation processes, and the need for policymakers to understand what work is necessary after policy decisions are made.

Tim Tenbensel

Associate Professor, School of Population Health, University of Auckland

Tim Tenbensel is an Associate Professor of health policy at the School of Population Health, University of Auckland. He is a political scientist and his research interests include health policy implementation, comparative health policy, performance management in health systems and the application of complexity theory to health system contexts.

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June 24, 2019 - Stephen Peckham
Incentives and the doctor, the practice and the network: reflections on the UK Quality and Outcomes Framework

Incentives and the doctor, the practice and the network: Reflections on the UK Quality and Outcomes Framework

Stephen Peckham discusses the impact and changes of the QOF in the UK focusing on some of the recent changes and future proposals for the use of incentive payments and shared savings schemes in England.

Stephen Peckham

Professor of Health Policy and Director of the Centre for Health Services Studies, University of Kent
Professor of Health Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Stephen Peckham is Professor of Health Policy and Director of the Centre for Health Services Studies at the University of Kent, Professor of Health Policy at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He is Director of the Department of Health and Social Care Policy Research Unit in the Health and Social Care System and Commissioning and Director of a new regional National Institute of Health Research  Applied Research Collaboration for the South East of England – a collaboration between universities, NHS and local government to support applied health and social care research. He has been a non-executive director of a Primary Care Trust and commissioning board member for NIHR, CIHR, Irish Health Research Board  and national UK charities.  His research interests are in health policy analysis, primary care and public health. Current research includes evaluating changes in the English Quality and Outcomes Framework,  evaluating the national Vanguard (Integrated Community Health providers) programme and a new programme of research on emerging Primary Care Networks.

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June 6, 2019 - Chris Ham
Integrated Care and Population Health: It's All About Health Systems

Integrated Care and Population Health: It’s All About Health Systems

Chris Ham, former Chief Executive of The King’s Fund will speak to the role of the UK Think Tank, outlining how they led the debate on integrated care and population health, influenced policy makers at a national level and locally, and then worked to support implementation. How do we go beyond influencing policy to ‘making it happen’ helping practically in the development of leaders and systems?

Sir Chris Ham

Independent Chair, Coventry and Warwickshire STP, non-executive Director, Royal Free London, NHS Foundation Trust, Co-Chair of the NHS Assembly and Visiting Senior Fellow at The King’s Fund

Sir Chris Ham is an experienced leader and has served on the boards of a number of organisations in both executive and non-executive roles. His career has encompassed the charitable sector, central government and universities. He has extensive networks among national and local NHS organisations and in local government and the third sector. He is currently independent chair of the Coventry and Warwickshire STP, non-executive director of the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, co-chair of the NHS Assembly, visiting senior fellow at The King’s Fund, and independent adviser to Carnall Farrar. His portfolio includes advising NHS organisations and their partners, speaking at conferences and seminars, and writing about health policy and management in the UK and other systems.

February 13, 2019 - Tsung-Mei Cheng
Taiwan’s Single-Payer National Health Insurance: Experience So Far and Future Challenges

Taiwan’s Single-Payer National Health Insurance: Experience So Far and Future Challenges

Taiwan’s National Health Insurance is a single payer system established in 1995. At its planning stage in the late 1980s it had looked to Canada, among other nations, for insights on how to implement a universal health coverage scheme. Insurance coverage in Taiwan is universal and the system has been able to maintain overall health spending as a percent of GDP that is considerably lower than the average for OECD nations, and at the same time meet the health care needs of its population without the often seen challenges to single payer systems such as long waiting times. The presentation will look at how Taiwan’s single-payer health system works, what are its strengths and weaknesses, and challenges going forward. Where possible, some comparisons with Canada’s health system will be included.Profile of Tsung-Mei Cheng

Tsung-Mei Cheng

Health Policy Research Analyst at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University

Tsung-Mei Cheng is Health Policy Research Analyst at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, USA. Cheng’s current research focuses on cross-national comparisons of health systems in the U.S., Europe and East Asia; health reforms in the U.S., China and Taiwan; health technology assessment and comparative effectiveness research; health care quality, financing, payment reform, including evidence based clinical guidelines and clinical pathways, and pay for performance (P4P) in East Asian health systems. She is co-founder of the Princeton Conference, an annual national conference on health policy that brings together government, the private sector, and the research community on issues affecting health care and health policy in the United States.

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November 12, 2018 - Thomas Rice
Improving Consumer Decision-Making in U.S. Health Insurance Markets: A Behavioral Economics Approach

Improving Consumer Decision-Making in U.S. Health Insurance Markets: A Behavioral Economics Approach

Many Americans face a daunting number of health insurance options and nearly all evidence indicates that they are not able to make choices that are in their best interests. Behavioral economics posits that limiting choices and simplifying information can improve consumer welfare. Evidence from some recent experiments will be presented.

Thomas Rice Thomas Rice

Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
Associate Director (United States) of the NAO

Thomas Rice is Professor of the Department of Health Policy and Management at UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. His areas of interest include health insurance, competition and regulation; physicians’ economic behavior; and Medicare. He was lead author of a book about the U.S. health care system, for the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies. Dr. Rice was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 2006. He was chair of the AcademyHealth Board of Directors in 2005-6, and previously he had been awarded its Article of the Year Award and its Young Investigator Award.

November 9, 2018 - Sabina Nuti
Improving performance in Healthcare: evaluation systems and governance tools

Improving performance in Healthcare: evaluation systems and governance tools

The seminar will provide with insights on past, present and future work that the Management and Health laboratory of Sant’Anna School of Pisa has been carrying out since 2004. The speaker will present the results of the longstanding constructive research on performance evaluation systems (PES) in healthcare in Italy. In particular, she will discuss the power of benchmarking, of the visualization tools and how the PES has been used across the Italian Regions. Moreover, the authors will present the results achieved and the governance tools adopted to improve the regional and organizational performance.

Sabina Nuti

Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

Sabina Nuti is Full Professor of Health Management in the Institute of Management at the Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies in Pisa, Italy (SSSA). Her interests are on performance evaluation systems, efficiency and governance mechanism in health care. She is responsible for the Interregional performance evaluation systems for more than half of Italian Regions. She is a member of the Expert Panel on Effective Ways of Investing in Health of the European Commission for the triennium 2016-2019. In 2016 she has been involved in the Joint Assessment Framework (JAF) in the Area of Health leaded by the European Commission, DG Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion Social Affairs. She is a Member of the Scientific Committee of the National Outcome Program at National Italian Agency for Regional Health Services. She has been a visiting professor at the University of Toronto. She is responsible for European and National research projects regarding healthcare management, performance evaluation and policies, and author of various national and international publications. She is a member of the Editorial Board of Health, Economics, Policy and Law, of the Cambridge University Press.

October 24, 2018 - Thomas Bossert
How to think about decentralization and federalism: International Cases

Evaluating Health System Decentralization in Federal Systems: Eight International Cases

Why is it so hard to know whether decentralization is a good policy for health systems? Many observers have made unsubstantiated claims for decentralization and federalism in part because there are many different ways to design and implement decentralization and federal policies. It is also very difficult to evaluate the impact of these policies because of the importance of different contexts and of simultaneous policies of funding, payment and service delivery changes in the health sector. We have applied a consistent approach, called “decision space”, to show the complex arrangements of decentralization and federal policies in 8 different countries and begin the process of evaluation in the hopes of providing recommendations for policy makers.

Thomas Bossert Thomas Bossert

Senior Lecturer on Global Health Policy, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health
Director, International Health Systems Program, Harvard School of Public Health

Thomas J. Bossert is a Senior Lecturer and the Director of the International Health Systems Program of the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. He has many years of experience in international health in Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, Asia and Central and Eastern Europe. His innovative “decision space” approach to decentralization has appeared in many prestigious journals and recently in an edited book on decentralization. At Harvard, he teaches courses on health system reform and political economy of health systems. He also teaches in the Harvard/World Bank Flagship Course on Health System Strengthening in Washington and in various countries around the world. Dr. Bossert earned his AB from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University and PhD in political science from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

March 21, 2018 - Katherine Boothe
Learning from abroad? Canadian pharmaceutical policy in comparative perspective

Learning from abroad? Canadian pharmaceutical policy in comparative perspective

Canada is the only country with a broad public health system that does not include pharmaceuticals. This talk considers Canadian pharmaceutical insurance policy in comparison to England and Australia, providing a historical explanation for the different paths of policy development in these three liberal welfare states. It summarizes their current differences in pharmaceutical policy, and reflects on the ways our ability to “learn from abroad” is enhanced by an understanding of the historical contexts in which health policies develop.

Katherine Boothe Profile of Katherine Boothe

Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, McMaster University
Member, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis

Katherine Boothe is an associate professor of political science at McMaster University and a member of the McMaster Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis. She holds a MA and PhD in political science from the University of British Columbia. She is the author of Ideas and the Pace of Change: National Pharmaceutical Insurance in Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom (2015), and is currently researching changes to the drug assessment process in Canada.

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February 28, 2018 - Miguel A. González-Block
Towards universal health coverage in Mexico. Progress and Challenges.

Towards universal health coverage in Mexico. Progress and Challenges.

Most Mexicans have gained access to a guaranteed health care package delivered through improved, pro-poor strategies. However, the health system remains segmented and inequitable, while centralization, inefficiency and even corruption limit funding and provision. In his talk, Miguel González Block will address the progress and challenges facing universal access to needed health interventions, free at the point of service. Governance will be discussed as the biggest challenge to enable the transition from the current president-centered, segmented and vertically integrated set of social security and assistance institutions, towards person-centered, plural health funding and provider networks.

Miguel A. González-Block Profile of Miguel Angel Gonzalez Block

Director, EviSys Consulting
PwC Chair in Health Systems Research, Anahuac University

Dr. Miguel Angel González-Block is Director General of Evisys Consultling and holds the PwC Chair in Health Systems Research at Anahuac University in Mexico City. He serves as editor emeritus for BiomedCentral’s Health Research Policy and Systems and was the founding Director of the Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research at the World Health Organization. Dr. González-Block has had 40 years’ experience in policy analysis and systems research at the National Institute of Public Health of Mexico, the Mexican Health Foundation, the Inter-American Development Bank and the World Health Organization. He has published over 160 publications in the areas of health policy analysis, implementation research, disease control strategies, health systems capacity strengthening, strategy development and implementation and health research utilization, among other fields. Dr. González-Block has collaborated in international health systems analysis in diverse teams, among which the Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research at WHO, the Tropical Disease Research and Training Program at WHO and through diverse consulting and research collaborations.

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October 29, 2017 - U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders
What the U.S. Can Learn from Canadian Health Care

What the U.S. Can Learn from Canadian Health Care

 

Dr. Danielle Martin with Greg Marchildon and U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders, President of U of T Meric Gertler and students at the Bernie Sanders lecture on Oct. 29
(L-R) Dr. Danielle Martin, Husayn Marani, Professor Gregory Marchildon, Director NAO; U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders, Meric Gertler, President, U of T; Michael Sherar
Photo Credit: Lisa Sakulensky

U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (Vermont) discusses “Medicare for All” in a lecture sponsored by the North American Observatory on Health Systems and Policies and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health. He was joined by Dr. Danielle Martin of Women’s College Hospital and the University of Toronto to discuss what the U.S. can learn from Canada’s single-payer health care system.

 

 

 

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September 25, 2017- James Gillespie
Perverse Policies? Comparing Private Health Insurance in Australia and Canada

Perverse Policies? Comparing Private Insurance in Australia and Canada James Gillespie

Australia and Canada have many similarities in health policy, starting with some of the main features of each country’s Medicare system. The workings of private health insurance provide a striking area of contrast. Australia has a duplicate system, in which private health insurance covers most of the services provided by public hospitals, constructing a parallel private system. Canada has kept the public and private separate. This talk will explore the different ways private funding works in each system and the consequences for equity, quality and access.

James Gillespie

Associate Professor, School of Public Health, University of Sydney
Deputy Director, Menzies Centre for Health Policy, University of Sydney

James Gillespie is an Associate Professor in Health Policy in the School of Public Health, University of Sydney and Deputy Director, Menzies Centre for Health Policy at the University of Sydney. He is author of Making Medicare: the Politics of Universal Health Care in Australia (2013) and numerous works on chronic illness and integrated care policy.

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July 6, 2017 - Martin McKee
Access and Quality: The Performance of Health Systems Worldwide

Access and Quality: The Performance of Health Systems Worldwide

In the 17 years since the World Health Report 2000, which controversially proposed measures of performance of 193 health systems worldwide, there have been enormous advances in the information available on health and disease worldwide, led by the Global Burden of Disease project. In this talk, Martin McKee will present new findings from the project, which have employed the concept of avoidable mortality and linked it to these new sources of data. He will discuss both the remaining challenges and the implications of these findings to researchers and policy decision-makers.

Martin McKee Martin McKee

Professor, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
Research Director, European Observatory on Health Systems and Policy

Martin McKee is Professor of European Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and was the founding director of the European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (ECOHOST), a WHO Collaborating Centre. He is also research director of the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies and president-elect of the European Public Health Association. He has published over 740 academic papers and 42 books and his contributions to European health policy have been recognized by, among others, election to the UK Academy of Medical Sciences, the Romanian Academy of Medical Sciences, and the US Institute of Medicine, by the award of honorary doctorates from Hungary, The Netherlands, and Sweden and visiting professorships at universities in Europe and Asia, the 2003 Andrija Stampar medal for contributions to European public health and in 2005 was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE).

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Resources

Healthcare Access and Quality Index based on mortality from causes amenable to personal health care in 195 countries and territories, 1990–2015: a novel analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. Barber, Ryan M et al. The Lancet, Volume 390, Issue 10091, 231 – 266

May 11, 2017 - Bruce Rosen
Public Policy on Dual (Public-Private) Physician Practice: Israel and Canada Compared

Public Policy on Dual (Public-Private) Physician Practice: Israel and Canada Compared

While provincial medicare policies currently discourage dual practices, these policies are under judicial review in the Cambie Surgeries case in British Columbia. This is an ideal time to review the origin and impact of these policies from a more international and comparative perspective.

Placing the regulation of dual practice in a health systems conceptual framework, Greg Marchildon and Bruce Rosen compare Canada and Israel. Although facing similar problems, the polities within these countries have developed different approaches to regulating dual practice in the public interest that provide useful policy lessons for each.

Bruce Rosen Bruce Rosen

Director, Smokler Center for Health Policy Research at Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute
Co-editor, Israel Journal of Health Policy Research

Dr. Bruce Rosen is the director of the Smokler Center for Health Policy Research – a division of the Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute. He is also co-editor of the Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, which seeks to promote intensive intellectual interactions between scholars from Israel and their counterparts from around the world. He holds a doctorate in health policy from the Harvard School of Public Health. Rosen is the lead author of the European Observatory’s country report for Israel and The Commonwealth Fund’s profile of the Israeli health care system. He co-edited Accountability and Responsibility in Health Care: Issues in Addressing an Emerging Global Challenge, which combined conceptual contributions from leading international scholars with local reports on how eight different health systems are addressing the accountability/responsibility challenge.

Greg Marchildon Greg Marchildon

Ontario Research Chair in Health Policy and System Design at IHPME
Founding Director, North American Observatory on Health Systems and Policies

The founding director of the NAO, Gregory P. Marchildon is Professor and Ontario Research Chair in Health Policy and System Design at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto.  A scholar-practitioner, Marchildon has extensive experience in establishing and working in national and international research and policy networks. A member of the editorial board of the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies, Marchildon is also the Canadian representative on the Health Systems and Policy Monitor network.

Other Events

March 6, 2019 - Boehm Lecture in Public Health and Health Care: Steve Thomas

Transforming Health Systems Towards Universal Care

Ireland has devised a ten-year plan for health reform through political consensus, spearheaded by Steve Thomas, Director of the Centre of Health Policy and Management at Trinity College Dublin. This high-level policy roadmap will transform the country’s two-tier structure into a universal, needs-based healthcare system.
The keynote and panel discussion explored the components of big bang policy change and system transformation — both in Ireland and Canada — including population health, entitlements, integrated care, funding and implementation.

Steve Thomas (Keynote)

Director, Centre of Health Policy and Management, Trinity College Dublin

Steve Thomas is the director of the Centre for Health Policy and Management at Trinity College Dublin. He has more than 60 peer-reviewed publications and has developed policies in Ireland including free general practice medical care for under-6s and over-70s. He has worked in international health economics research and government policy for more twenty years with long-term postings in South Africa, Bangladesh, and Uganda.

Panel

  • Dr. Rueben Devlin, Special Advisor Healthcare, Chair, Premier’s Council on Improving Healthcare and Ending Hallway Medicine
  • Carolyn Hughes Tuohy, Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Founding Fellow in Public Policy, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto
  • Julie Drury, Patient and Family Advisor

Click here for the event page.

November 30, 2018 - Lunch and Learn Session: Ellen Nolte

Challenges of International Policy Learning, and Reflections on a Career in and out of Academia

This special lunch and learn with Ellen Nolte was co-hosted by the Health Systems Performance Research Network.

Ellen Nolte

Professor of Health Services and Systems Research, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Ellen Nolte is Professor of Health Services and Systems Research at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. She holds a PhD from London University and a Master’s degree in public health (MPH). Her expertise is in health systems research, international health care comparisons and performance assessment. Over the past decade she has developed an internationally recognised research portfolio around innovative service models that seek to better meet the needs of people with complex and long-term health problems, with a particular focus on care coordination and integration within and across sectors. She has published widely on health systems, integrated care, European health policy and population health assessments both in the international peer-reviewed literature and the wider literature. Ellen was previously head of London Hubs of the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies and Director of the Health and Healthcare Policy programme at RAND Europe, Cambridge, UK.

Click here for the event page.

November 29, 2018 - Boehm Lecture in Public Health and Health Care: Ellen Nolte

Leading Edge Options to Integrate Care

The Boehm Lectures on Public Health and Healthcare (formerly the Leadership Series) aim to foster a dialogue and engage the public health and health system communities on significant issues facing the health of Canadians.

This sold-out lecture explored options to transform health systems towards a greater focus on integration and person-centredness. It examined the evidence on the range of strategies to strengthen person-centred health services and systems and how available approaches can meet the various challenges health systems are facing today and to guide the development of more informed policies and practices.

Ellen Nolte (Keynote)

Professor of Health Services and Systems Research, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

As the former lead of the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies London office, Dr. Nolte’s talk will draw on her expertise in international health care comparisons and her work on innovative service models that seek to better meet the needs of people with complex and long-term health problems. She will explore effective strategies that place individuals, their families and communities at the centre of the health system and enable people to play an active role in their own care as well as in shaping the system that serves them.

Panel

  • Sarah Downey, President and CEO, Michael Garron Hospital
  • Kerry Kuluski, Assistant Professor, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation; Research Scientist, Bridgepoint Collaboratory for Research and Innovation
  • Graydon Smith, Mayor, Town of Bracebridge
  • Walter Wodchis, Professor, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation; Research Chair of Implementation and Evaluation Science, Trillium Health Partners’ Institute for Better Health

Click here for the event page.

October 25, 2018 - NAO Book Launch: Federalism and Decentralization in Health Care

Federalism and Decentralization in Health Care: A Decision Space Approach

Gregory P. Marchildon and Thomas J. Bossert

Even though health system decentralization is often associated with federations, there has been limited study on the connection between federalism and the organization of publicly financed or mandated health services. Federalism and Decentralization in Health Care examines eight federations that differ in terms of their geography, history and constitutional and political development. Looking at Canada, Brazil, Germany, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, South Africa and Switzerland, it explores vital health care issues such as constitutional responsibility, national laws, and the source and organization of public revenues.

Beyond these structural features, each country case system is subjected to a “decision space analysis” to determine the actual degree of decentralization. A core question is whether national and subnational governments have narrow, moderate or broad discretion in their decisions on governance, access, human resources, health system organization and financing. This comparative approach highlights the similarities and differences among these federations.

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February 6, 2017 - NAO Launch Event

North American Observatory on Health Systems and Policies (NAO) Launch Event

The North American Observatory on Health Systems and Policies (NAO) is a collaborative partnership of interested researchers, research organizations, governments, and health organizations promoting evidence-informed health system policy decision-making. Due to the high degree of health system decentralization in the United States and Canada, the NAO is committed to focusing considerable attention to state and provincial health systems and to creating a foundation for more systematic health system and policy comparisons among substates.

Speakers

  • The Honourable Roy Romanow
    Former Premier and Chair of the Royal Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada
    Chancellor, University of Saskatchewan
  • Dr. Bob Bell
    Deputy Minister of Health and Long-Term Care, Ontario
  • Maureen O’Neil
    President, Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement
  • Dr. Richard Saltman
    Professor, Health Policy & Management, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta
    Associate Director of Research Policy, European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies, Brussels

This event is hosted by Adalsteinn (Steini) Brown, the Director of the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (IHPME) at the University of Toronto, and Greg Marchildon, Ontario Research Chair in Health Policy and System Design at IHPME and the Founding Director of the NAO.

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