Course Descriptions – MSc/PhD HSR

HAD5011H: Canada’s Health Care System
HAD5726H: Evaluation and Research Design in Health Informatics
HAD5727H: Knowledge Transfer and Exchange
HAD5728H: Performance Measurements in Healthcare: Theory and Application
HAD5730H: Economic Evaluation Methods for Health Services Research
HAD5737H: Tools for Implementation of Best Evidence
HAD5738H: Advanced Methods for Economic Evaluation
HAD5740H: Intermediate Level Qualitative Research for Health Services and Policy Research
HAD5742H: Mixed Methods for Health Services Research 
HAD5743H: Evaluation Design For Complex Interventions
HAD5744H: Introduction to Health Econometrics
HAD5746H: Applied Health Econometrics
HAD5755Y: Health Economics Graduate Seminar Series
HAD5756H: Fundamentals of Research Ethics
HAD5760H: Advanced Health Economics and Policy Analysis
HAD5763H: Advanced Methods in Health Services Research
HAD5765H: Case Studies in Health Policy
HAD5771H: Resource Allocation Ethics
HAD5772H: Intermediate Statistics for Health Services Researchers
HAD5773H: Introduction to Theories of Organizational Behaviour and Applications to the Health Care Sector
HAD5780H: Program Planning and Evaluation for Health Services and Policy Research
HAD6750H: Advanced Health Economics and Policy Analysis II
HAD6760H: Introduction to Health Services Research Theory and Methods
HAD6761H: Health Services Outcomes and Evaluation Comprehensive Course
HAD6762H: Health Services Organization and Management Comprehensive Course
HAD6763H: Health Policy Comprehensive Course
HAD6770H: Applying Health Services Research Methods
HAD7001H-F1: Strategic Project Management for Research
HAD7001H-S3: Evidence Synthesis for Health Services, Systems and Policy Research
HAD7001H-F3: Health Technology Policy and Systems
HAD7001H-F4: How to Research, Write, Present and Defend
HSR1001H: Introduction to Qualitative Methods
JNH5003H: Home and Community Care Knowledge Translation

HAD5011H

Course Number HAD5011H
Course Name Canada’s Health Care System
Prerequisite n/a (see below)
Delivery Format Weekly
Semester Offered Fall
Instructor TBD
Description: The Canadian health care system (Medicare) remains a top policy issue and a key-defining characteristic of Canadian identity. There continues to be strong public and political support for Medicare’s guiding principles: universality, comprehensiveness, accessibility, public administration and portability. Yet, as recent federal and provincial reports on health care have emphasized, Medicare faces tremendous challenges. An aging and increasingly diverse population, new diseases, new and more costly medical technologies, as well as changing values and expectations have generated rising and more complex demands. There is an increasing emphasis on community-based health promotion and social support in contrast to more traditional care in hospitals and institutional settings. Individuals and communities are demanding a greater role in decisions about their health and the use of scarce health resources at the same time as the pressures of globalization begin to constrain the capacity of governments to implement domestic policy solutions. In spite of billions of new health care dollars, public concerns about long waits for care in Canada continue to fuel debate about the “sustainability” of publicly funded health care and the need for commercial health care options. HAD5011 (and HAD5010, its counterpart for students in the professional stream) is the first of two courses which develop and apply a policy analysis “tool kit” to critically analyze key issues and trends in Canada’s health care system and health policy. Course sections examine the current state of health care in Canada, the public-private mix, the influence of powerful interest groups, and the shift toward home and community care, paying particular attention to the ideas, interests, and institutions which have shaped the Canadian health care system in the past and continue to shape its future. HAD5010/5011 is designed for health professionals and students of health policy who need to “make sense” of a rapidly changing and increasingly politicized health care environment in which “evidence” is often only one, but rarely the most important factor driving change. HAD5011 is directed towards students in research streams (MSc/PhD) who must demonstrate strong analytical skills and a more developed mastery of the research literature.
Objectives: This course has two purposes: introduce students to some key content about current trends and issues in Canada’s health care system and health policy; and develop analytic tools for critically analyzing them. By bringing together students, tutors and faculty from a range of different disciplines and backgrounds, the course also aims to increase understanding and awareness of the range of interests, ideas and approaches, which shape ongoing health policy debates.This course develops analytic tools for critically analyzing current trends and issues in Canada’s health care system and health policy.Upon successful completion of this course, you should be able to:

  • identify and discuss major elements of Canada’s health care system
  • describe key issues and trends in health care delivery and health policy
  • demonstrate a developed understanding of basic tools for policy analysis
  • apply these tools to analyze critically current issues and trends in Canada’s health care system
Evaluation: Evaluation is based on active participation in tutorials, 2 briefing notes, an oral presentation and an analytic paper.
Prerequisite: There are no formal course prerequisites. However, course assignments require:

  • a basic understanding of the major elements of Canada’s health care system
  • an awareness of major trends and issues
  • a developed ability to read and use course materials and other sources to research and write graduate-level, analytic assignments
  • developed English language (reading and writing) abilities.

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HAD5726H

Course Number HAD5726H
Course Name Evaluation and Research Design in Health Informatics
Prerequisite An intermediate-level health informatics course
Delivery Format 2 hour sessions weekly
Semester Offered Fall
Instructors Aviv Shachak
Description: This will be a weekly seminar course that will introduce advance topics to MSc and PhD students in the study area of, or with interest in, health informatics research.  This course sill be highly interactive and focus on how to design, conduct and report evaluation studies in Health Informatics, with “real-world” examples.
Objectives: The objective of this course is to provide students with a sound understanding of the fundamental principles and the challenges in designing Health Informatics evaluation and research.
Evaluation:

In-class presentation and discussion of selected readings 30%
Class participation 10%
Mid-term – outline for final paper 20%
Final paper (oral presentation 10 % + written paper 30%) 40%

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HAD5727H

Course Number HAD5727H
Course Name Knowledge Transfer and Exchange: The Art and Science of Making Research Relevant and Increasing Utilization
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Once a week for 3 hours (9 weeks)
Semester Offered Winter
Instructors Monika Kastner
Description: The course examines the theoretical and practical dimensions of knowledge transfer and exchange (KT&E). The subject is viewed from a number of perspectives and provides students with an understanding of what knowledge transfer and exchange is, how to assess when knowledge is ready to be transferred, the impacts organizational/cultural and decision-making factors play in the uptake of knowledge, and the skills and knowledge involved in the effective practice of knowledge transfer and exchange.Given the priority to knowledge transfer now being given by granting agencies, governments and the health care decision-makers, the course will help prepare students involved in research to meet the changing demands and expectations attached to their research.  The course will assist students to incorporate knowledge transfer and exchange principles and practices into their thinking about the conduct and communication of their research.  for those considering an in-depth program of knowledge transfer and exchange focused research, this course will provide a sound introduction to the field as a whole.   The course will use an interactive format and will integrate didactic presentations, case examples and application of the material in independent project work.  Learning will take place through various modalities including lectures, small group exercises and full class discussions.  The course instructors’ experience and work in mental health and addictions health services research and consulting will be augmented by the expertise of guests from different health areas who will bring their experience as producers, users or brokers of knowledge.  Students will be responsible for leading the discussion on the course readings.
Objectives:

  • To develop core knowledge of knowledge transfer and exchange issues, concepts, models and methods
  • To understand the uses of knowledge transfer and exchange in research, policy making, management and clinical practice
  • To learn how to apply knowledge transfer theory and practice to student research
  • To learn techniques to help in the measurement and evaluation of knowledge transfer and exchange
Evaluation:

Assignment 1 20%
Assignment 2 50%
Student Led Discussion 20%
Class Participation 10%

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HAD5728H

Course Number HAD5728H
Course Name Performance Measurements in Healthcare: Theory and Application
Prerequisite n/a Note:  Instructor permission required
Delivery Format One 3 hour seminar per week
Semester Offered Spring
Instructors Imtiaz Daniel
Description: This is an elective for students in graduate research programs who wish to gain a better understanding of performance measurement in health care and the methods available to develop performance measurement systems and specific indicators of performance. The course will provide an overview of different models for performance measurement, indicator development strategies and a discussion of issues specific to several stakeholder groups. This course will also be available for all students enrolled in the Ontario Training Centre Collaborative Program in Health Services and Policy Research, and will directly address both research and policy competency components. Students working in other public sectors, such as education, may also find the course useful.
Objectives:

  1. To understand performance measurement frameworks and models that are currently available across the health care system (what to measure and why).
  2. To describe several different methods for identifying, selecting and validating specific types of performance measures (how to measure – soundness, relevance).
  3. To become familiar with emerging issues in the calculation, reporting, and uptake of individual components of performance measurement frameworks by varying stakeholder groups (appropriateness, feasibility, and relevance of measures and frameworks).
Evaluation:

Individual class presentation 15%
Individual assignment 35%
Group project 40%
Participation 10%

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HAD5730H

Course Number HAD5730H
Course Name Economic Evaluation Methods for Health Services Research
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly lectures (3 hours)
Semester Offered Fall
Instructor Peter Coyte / Rebecca Hancock-Howard
Description: Health Economics is concerned with the study of resource allocation within the health sector and between that sector and other sectors.  This course is designed to introduce participants to an array of economic evaluation methods used to assess health care programs, services, technologies, and other interventions.  Prior knowledge of economics is not required; however, participants are expected to possess quantitative skills (e.g., the ability to undertake statistical analyses). Upon completion, participants will not only have analytic skills that are applicable to economic evaluation, they will also know how economists approach important issues in health services research and decision-making.
Objectives:

  • To introduce learners to different types of economic evaluations.
  • To acquaint learners with the approaches and viewpoints that applied health economists bring to health services research.
  • To apply economic evaluation techniques to important contemporary issues in Canadian health services research and decision-making.
Evaluation:

Homework assignment 15%
Project proposal 15%
Classroom participation 10%
Project presentation 10%
Final course project 50%

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HAD5737H

Course Number HAD5737H
Course Name Tools for Implementation of Best Evidence
Prerequisite n/a (see below)
Delivery Format Weekly, 3 hour seminar
Semester Offered Spring
Instructor Anna Gagliardi
Description: This course will provide learners with a comprehensive working knowledge of implementation science. Also known as knowledge translation, this subject focuses on the effectiveness and optimizing of approaches and strategies to enhance research utilization through understanding of the complex, interacting factors that can influence health care delivery and outcomes. This knowledge is relevant to health system leaders, continuing education planners, guideline implementers, practicing clinicians, health care managers, and health services researchers. The course will review how educational, social, patient, organizational, incentive and embedded approaches and strategies can be applied to close the gap between best evidence and practice.
Objectives:At the completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the meaning of implementation science/knowledge translation
  • Identify and explain various theories underlying implementation science/knowledge translation
  • Describe determinants that influence the utilization of knowledge, practice and technology
  • Discuss the applicability and mechanism of action of various implementation strategies
  • Understand the effectiveness of approaches/strategies and how they can be tailored/optimized
  • Design a quality improvement program or research study involving implementation
Evaluation:

Problem analysis (600 words) 10%
Project proposal (1,000 words) 20%
Facilitation (reading summary, lead discussion on one topic) 25%
Final paper based on problem/proposal (10 pages) 35%
Participation (actively and meaningfully engage in weekly discussion) 10%
Prerequisite: While not required, the course is complementary to others in the Knowledge Translation specialty stream,  and students would benefit from also having taken research methods courses.
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HAD5738H

Course Number HAD5738H
Course Name Advanced Methods for Economic Evaluation
Prerequisite HAD5730H, a statistics course, and the instructor’s permission
Delivery Format Weekly lectures (3 hours)
Semester Offered Winter
Instructor  Wanrudee Isaranuwatchai
Description: The course is about advanced methods for estimation and uncertainty of cost-effectiveness statistics.  The focus is on techniques to create and explain economic information in person-level data (e.g., from a clinical trial or an administrative data set).  Students must have taken HAD 5730 and be familiar with statistical techniques like regression.   Upon completing this course, participants will be able to create and explain the results of a cost-effectiveness analysis of person-level data.
Objectives: This course is designed to attain three general objectives as well as a series of specific competency objectives:

  1. To introduce learners to regression as a technique for creating cost-effectiveness estimates.
  2. To introduce learners to regression as a technique for handling uncertainty in cost-effectiveness analysis.
  3. To acquaint learners with advanced techniques from regression that can be applied to cost-effectiveness analysis.

Upon completion of this course, learners will be able to:

  1. Have a better understanding of economic evaluations and their potential roles.
  2. Identify multiple ways of creating cost-effectiveness estimates and characterizing their uncertainty; understand their strengths and limitations.
  3. Analyze person-level cost and effect data in a way that improves the chances of it being published.
  4. Explain the results of their cost-effectiveness analysis in a way that improves the chances of it being understood.
  5. Write the “economics” section of a grant proposal (e.g. CIHR) in a way that improves the chances of it being funded.
Evaluation:

Attendance/participation 5%
Homework assignments 20%
Test #1 20%
Test #2 20%
Take home final 35%

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HAD5740H

Course Number HAD5740H
Course Name Intermediate Level Qualitative Research for Health Services and Policy Research
Prerequisite HSR1001H or any other introductory level qualitative methods course at the graduate level. Note:  Instructor permission required. No auditors.
Delivery Format Weekly, 2 hour lectures
Semester Offered Winter
Instructor Fiona Webster / Joanna Sale
Description: This course will provide intermediate level instruction in the use of qualitative methods in health services research, clinical research, policy and medical education research.  It is intended as part of a suite of qualitative methodology courses available to IHPME students.  Students who are in the initial to mid stages of designing and conducting their thesis research will be exposed to intense instruction related to issues in field research, including: study design; data collection; analysis; and writing. Students will be expected to come to class prepared to actively engage in group discussions and to discuss their own thesis work.  Students who complete this course will be able to begin conducting qualitative research.
Objectives: After completing this course, students will:

  • Be able to choose and apply the various philosophical foundations, traditions, and methods grouped under the rubric of “qualitative research” and appreciate the complexity of doing qualitative research
  • Have experience with and able to apply the main techniques used for gathering qualitative data
  • Have experience with and be able to apply the different analytic strategies used in qualitative research, including coding and development of themes
  • Have experience with and be able to write up the results of a qualitative study
Evaluation:

Seminar presentation/facilitation-reflexive paper 15%
Pilot project proposal 25%
Final paper: Pilot Final Report 60%

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HAD5742H

Course Number HAD5742H
Course Name Mixed Methods in Health Services Research
Prerequisite HSR1001H
Delivery Format 3 hours a week
Semester Offered Spring
Instructors Katie Dainty
Description:In this course students will engage in the theory and practice of mixed methods research. In the past several decades, Mixed Methods Research (MMR) has developed dramatically. Over this timeframe, it has been associated with several different definitions. The working definition we will use in this course involves the collection and analysis of both qualitative and quantitative data in a way that either merges the data, has one build off of the other, embeds one within the other or is developed around a mixed methodological philosophical or theoretical orientation that informs all aspects of the study. Throughout the course a range of mixed methods research designs will be discussed with examples that draw from applications in health research. Students will work through a MMR project that has been pre-designed for this class.
Objectives:

  • To identify key philosophical & theoretical issues in MMR and multiple examples of mixed method designs.
  • To contrast key features of quantitative and qualitative research.
  • To articulate and reflect on their own perceptions about the current state of MMR.
  • To apply and demonstrate knowledge about collecting and analyzing data to an original MMR project.
Evaluation:

1) Reflection Assignments 20%
2) In-class Facilitation 10%
2) Paper Proposal  10%
3) Group Presentation of Paper  10%
4) Final Paper  50%

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HAD5743H

Course Number HAD5743H
Course Name Evaluation Design For Complex Interventions
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly 3 hour seminar
Semester Offered Winter
Instructor Sanjeev Sridharan
Description: The growing focus on learning and accountability in Canada and internationally has resulted in an increasing need for evaluation approaches to understand and assess if policies work, how they work, and what can be done in planning and implementing policies to make them work. Given the complexity of some of the health policies, the designs and approaches required to evaluate some of the policies need to go beyond standard clinical trials and often will involve the evaluator working with the policymakers and program planners right at the formulation of the policy and program. This class will focus on an evaluation of a variety of complex policy and programmatic interventions, all of which have the ambition of improving health outcomes. Topics to be covered in this class include: the role of program theory and why we need to think theoretically about complex interventions; types of evaluation approaches and how they respond to complexity (approaches will include realist evaluation and developmental evaluation); types of threats to validity in evaluation design including internal and external validity ; varieties of evaluation design including experimental and quasi-experimental designs; and the relationships between program theory, threats to validity and evaluation design.
Objective: At the end of the course, for a given intervention, students will be able to design and execute an evaluation that includes consideration of key evaluation questions; is appropriate to the program theory of the intervention; addresses key threats to design validity; and addresses policymaker and practitioner perspectives.
Evaluation:

Class participation 10%
Homework assignments 15%
Interim evaluation plan 25%
Evaluation plan 50%

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HAD5744H

Course Number HAD5744H
Course Name Introduction to Health Econometrics
Prerequisite Statistics (preferably at the graduate level)
Delivery Format Weekly
Semester Offered Fall
Instructor David Rudoler
Description: This course is designed to provide an introduction to econometric methods. That is, the basic principles of regression model development and testing that underlie much of applied health economics and health services research. The starting point is the fact that a great number of possible data generating processes yield very similar looking data series. The course deals with how to determine which data generating process, from among the range of possible ones, has actually generated the data you are working with. To that end, the course deals with application of statistical tests and procedures in the context of distinguishing between potential regression models. Students will learn about important methodological considerations when working with both survey and administrative datasets. It is assumed that students have a basic training in statistics.
Evaluation:

Six Assignments (10% each) 60%
Major Paper 40%

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HAD5746H

Course Number HAD5746H
Course Name Applied Health Econometrics
Prerequisite HAD5744H
Delivery Format Weekly (2 hours)
Semester Offered Winter
Instructor Claire de Oliveira

Description: The goal of this course is to provide students with the necessary tools to address issues that involve the empirical analysis of observational (i.e. non-experimental) data.  The focus of the course is on estimating treatment effects and we will review several different approaches that can be helpful in doing so.  Theory will be presented and, whenever possible, applied examples will also be presented.

Objectives:

At the end of this course, students will be able to use these tools to:

  • Choose the right research question
  • Use appropriate data and statistical methods to address the question
  • Interpret results
Evaluation:

Proposal 30%
Paper 45%
Presentation 15%
Class Participation 10%

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HAD5755Y

Course Number HAD5755Y
Course Name Health Economics Graduate Seminar Series
Prerequisite
Delivery Format Seminar once per week (2 hours)
Semester Offered Fall and Winter
Instructor Audrey Laporte

Description:The focus of this seminar series is on the practicalities of doing research in health economics.  It is open to all IHPME graduate students.  The students will gain experience in the application of the methodological and theoretical tools of economics to their own work.  The aim in part of the seminar is to reinforce concepts covered in IHPME graduate courses.  The seminar also aims to expose students to emerging issues in the field of health economics.  There will be invited speakers who will discuss particular issues in research in health economics theory and methods as they are encountered in actual ongoing research projects.  Thesis stage students will be required to present their own research and to actively participate in discussions of each other’s presentations and presentations of invited speakers.  The seminar series takes place over 2 terms (September to April) and students are expected to attend 75% of all sessions.

Objectives:

  • Learn how to present a scientific paper
  • Learn about a range of econometric (regression) methods that can be applied to health and health care data

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HAD5756H

Course Number HAD5756H
Course Name Fundamentals of Research Ethics
Prerequisite N/A
Delivery Format Seminar (maximum 12 students)
Semester Offered Spring 2018
Instructor Don Willison
Description: This course will introduce students to the conceptual and practical ethical issues that they will face in research both as students and future investigators. Topics to be covered include: history and foundations of research ethics, ethics principles and frameworks, the Tri-Council Policy Statement, research ethics boards, demarcating research from practice, program evaluation and quality improvement, risk and benefit analysis, recruitment and consent, privacy and confidentiality, community based paticipatory research, special challenges with qualitative methods, global health research, research integrity, conflict of interest, data management and analysis, and publication.

Objectives:

Students will learn to integrate, throughout the lifecycle of their research, principles of:

  • Integrity in research practise
  • ethics in research involving human participants

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Knowledge of key ethics principles and frameworks in bioethics and in public health
  • Ability to apply these principles when analyzing the ethical issues in research scenarios
  • Ability to analyse different perspectives in areas of ethical controversy
Evaluation:

Participation 10%
Written reflections 10%
Leading a case study 15%
Mid-term quiz 20%
Final paper 45%

HAD5760H

Course Number HAD5760H
Course Name Advanced Health Economics and Policy Analysis
Prerequisite HAD5730H or equivalent
Delivery Format Lecture/seminar once per week (2 hours)
Semester Offered Fall
Instructor Mayvis Rebeira / Eric Nauenberg
Description: Economic models of human and institutional behaviour are employed in this course to analyse the workings of the medical market. Specific attention is paid to the behaviour of both health care providers (e.g., physicians and hospitals) and health care clients. In analysing the behaviour of these participants in the health care industry, attention is paid to the socio-economic dimensions of health, health reform, physician supply management and payment reform, and health system restructuring.
Objectives:

  • To introduce participants to theoretical and empirical research conducted internationally in health economics.
  • To acquaint participants with major public policy issues in the field of health that have attracted the attention of health economists.
  • To develop analytic skills so that participants will be able to read and critically evaluate theoretical and policy research in health economics.
Evaluation:

Two assignments (20% each) 40%
Course Participation (presentation) 10%
Tutorial Report 50%

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HAD5763H

Course Number HAD5763H
Course Name Advanced Methods in Health Services Research
Prerequisite n/a (see below)
Delivery Format Weekly seminar
Semester Offered Spring
Instructor Geoff Anderson
Description: This seminar course covers conceptual and methodological issues related to descriptive and observational health services research.
Objectives: The objectives of the course are:

  1. To provide students with an understanding of key conceptual and methodological issues related to assessing the validity of measures used in health services research.
    • At the end of the course, the students should be able to assess the validity of measures used in health services research and to apply the principles of validation to the measures used in their own research.
  2. To provide students with an overview of issues related to the validity of observational designs in health services research.
    • At the end of the course, the students should be able to assess the validity of studies that use observational methods and to apply principles for designing valid observational studies to their research.
Evaluation: The evaluation for the course will be based on written assignments and oral presentations.
Prerequisite: Prerequisites include an understanding of basic research design and statistics including regression techniques. Knowledge and experience with clinical patient care as well as familiarity with existing data sources are an asset, but are not prerequisites for the course. top

HAD5765H

Course Number HAD5765H
Course Name Case Studies in Health Policy
Prerequisite HAD5011H OR equivalent (see below)
Delivery Format Modular
Semester Offered Winter
Instructor Raisa Deber
Description: This course analyzes the formation and implementation of public policy through the use of case studies, focused about important theoretical concepts. Students will develop the ability to understand and analyze the processes by which public policies are formed, and the ability to perform comparisons of policy alternatives. Guest lecturers may be used where appropriate to expand upon the process of policy implementation in an informal format.Cases to be analyzed will be selected from the attached list by the class. With the permission of the instructor, new cases may be added.
Objectives: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • understand and analyze the processes by which public policies are formed and implemented,
  • perform comparisons of policy alternatives,
  • analyze and discuss case studies in class,
  • organize and manage an in-class discussion of a case study, and apply appropriate theoretical concepts to better understand and analyze public policy.
Evaluation:

Class participation 20%
Presentation of case study in class 30%
Written assignment (may be group mark) 50%
Prerequisite:Students should be familiar with such basic concepts as:

  • Introduction to Canadian politics
  • Policy formation – including roles of Royal Commissions, task forces, committees, etc.
  • Budgetary system
  • Policy outputs (including distributive, regulatory, redistributive policies)
  • Policy instruments
  • Factors influencing policy formation, especially pressure groups and media
  • Inter-governmental relations
  • Inter-departmental relations; resource allocation within departments
  • Policy/Administration tension
  • Roles of experts vs/ generalists; administrators vs. politicians
  • Role of quasi-independent agencies; regulation

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HAD5771H

Course Number HAD5771H
Course Name Resource Allocation Ethics
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Six 4 hour seminars
Semester Offered Winter
Instructor Jennifer Gibson
Description: This course will introduce students to key topics in priority setting (resource allocation) from both theoretical and practical viewpoints. The goal is for students to develop a better understanding of priority setting (resource allocation) in health care institutions and health systems from an interdisciplinary perspective. We will explore the contributions and interaction of ethics, economics, political science , and management science approaches to priority setting.  Case studies will be a constitutive component of each session.
Objectives:

  • To introduce priority setting (resource allocation) and different approaches and perspectives to priority setting, including traditional disciplinary perspectives.
  • To examine different ethical issues in priority setting and introduce ‘accountability for reasonableness’ as a priority setting framework for health care institutions
  • To examine the most recent cutting-edge research and/or practice improvements.
  • To develop and present a case study of priority setting in learner’s own context
Evaluation:

Commentary 35%
Group Presentation 15%
Paper 50%

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HAD5772H

Course Number HAD5772H
Course Name Intermediate Statistics for Health Services Researchers
Prerequisite A graduate-level statistics course
Delivery Format Weekly, 2 hour lecture
Semester Offered Winter
Instructor Ty Perreira

Description: This course is designed to prepare students in the following areas: correlation; regression; analysis of variance (including factorial, repeated-measures, mixed-design, multivariate); analysis of covariance; logistic regression; factor analysis; and introduction to structural equation modeling (SEM).

Note: Students are required to bring a laptop to each class (including session 1) with SPSS installed.  This software is available from the Univeristy at a reduced rate for students.  Please see: http://sites.utoronto.ca/ic/software/detail/spssStudent.html

Objectives: At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding  (both conceptual and practical) of the analysis approaches covered  in this course;
  • Identify appropriate analysis approach(es) to address specific research questions;
  • Identify appropriate analysis approach(es) to use with data that has already been collected;
  • Use of the computer program SPSS for data management, statistical exploration and analysis, and understanding and explaining results;
  • Present analysis results in APA format.
Evaluation:

Knowledge assesments (10 assessments at 10% each) 100%

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HAD5773H

Course Number HAD5773H
Course Name Introduction to Theories of Organizational Behaviour and Applications to the Health Care Sector
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Seminar
Semester Offered Fall
Instructor Whitney Berta
Description: This seminar introduces the dominant theories used by health services researchers to study phenomena relating to organizational behavior in health services organizations and systems. Theories reviewed in this course are applicable to micro-, meso-, or macro-levels of analysis. Seminar topics typically include organization theory; system-level performance; inter-organizational relationships and networks; social capital; organizational learning; knowledge transfer, knowledge translation and knowledge utilization; innovation diffusion; change theory including complexity theory and whole systems change; group decision-making and team effectiveness; leadership and followership; and an array of micro-OB topics including organizational commitment, organizational justice, job satisfaction, motivation theory/expectancy theory and organizational citizenship behaviours. The last two sessions are allocated to student presentations, where students present a research idea and related research question(s) that are motivated using theory reviewed in the course.
Objectives:

  1. Conversance with dominant theories of organizational behaviour and their relevance to the study of issues in health services organizations;
  2. Ability to critically analyze a research article that uses as its theoretical framework one of the theories discussed in seminar;
  3. Ability to develop a viable research question(s) that is motivated and explored using one or more of the theories discussed in seminar
Evaluation:

Paper Critique 25%
Discussion Leadership 30%
Final paper 45%

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HAD5780H

Course Number HAD5780H
Course Name Program Planning and Evaluation for Health Services and Policy Research
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Distance/Online
Semester Offered Winter (contact the instructor)
Instructor Rhonda Cockerill
Description: This course will provide an overview of the current status of program planning and evaluation. Its purpose is to give participants an understanding of the planning and evaluation process, to familiarize them with current program planning and evaluation techniques and to have them develop the skills to apply these techniques to the health and social services sector. This course is targeted at research stream students.
Objectives: The objectives of the course include:

  • Reviewing the role of program planning and evaluation within broader management and policy processes, and discussing the characteristics and nature of these activities,
  • Discussing the different types of evaluation, including needs assessments, process and outcome evaluations, from the perspectives of different stakeholders, and
  • Developing the skills to apply planning and evaluation concepts to the health and social services sector.

A secondary objective of the course is to provide an opportunity for students to develop expertise in working in groups in an on-line environment.

Evaluation:

Unit Computer Conference 20%
Group Assignment 1 15%
Individual Assignment 1 20%
Group Assignment 2 15%
Individual Assignment 2 30%

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HAD6750H

Course Number HAD6750H
Course Name Advanced Health Economics and Policy Analysis II
Prerequisite HAD5760H
Delivery Format Lecture/seminar once per week (2 hours)
Semester Offered Winter
Instructor Nancy Reichman
Description: This is a seminar course required for all PhD students in the Health Economics PAS of the IHPME HSR doctoral program. This year it will be an applied and highly interactive course in which each student will develop an original, empirical research paper based on economic theory that ideally will become a chapter of his/her dissertation and publishable in a relevant scholarly outlet.  The group meetings will cover the various stages of the empirical research process — picking a topic that contributes to the economics literature, framing research question(s) using economic theory, reviewing and synthesizing the relevant literature, identifying an appropriate and available public dataset for addressing the identified research question(s), laying out an appropriate research design, obtaining and working with data, interpreting preliminary results and outlining next steps.  Each student will update the group on the status of his/her project at each meeting as we move through the various phases of the research process, will be expected to engage in discussions about the other students’ projects and will make a more formal presentation of his/her research project at the end of the course.  Students must have completed HAD5760H:  Advanced Health Economics and Policy Analysis.
Objectives:

  • To guide students through the development of an original empirical research project in health economics
  • To involve students in the development and constructive review of their peers’ research projects
  • To provide experience formally presenting original research
Evaluation:

Outline 10%
Participation 15%
Major Paper 60%
Presentation 15%

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HAD6760H & HAD6770H

Course Number HAD6760H (Fall) & HAD6770H (Winter)
Course Name Introduction to Health Services Research Theory and Methods
Prerequisite doctoral students only
Delivery Format Once a week, 3 hours
Semester Offered Fall & Winter
Instructors Whitney Berta & Walter Wodchis
Description: The field of health services research draws upon theories, research designs and methods from a wide variety of disciplines including social and behavioural sciences, clinical sciences, management and administrative sciences, law, epidemiology and biostatistics. The goal of this course is to provide a forum for doctoral students to explore theoretical/conceptual frameworks, study designs and research methods, and to apply them in the preparation of a health services research project.
Objectives: Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:

  • Draw upon and integrate the research theories and methods used in  a variety of disciplines to define a research question and plan a health services research project;
  • Develop a conceptual framework for a research study and use it as the basis for a study design;
  • Understand the application of quantitative and qualitative methods used in health services research;
  • Demonstrate the analytic skills required to critically read and evaluate the health services research literature;
  • Develop and defend a research question, conceptual framework and methodology that addresses an important health services research question.
Evaluation – Fall Term (HAD6760H)

  • Class facilitation
  • Literature review
  • Development of conceptual framework
  • Poster presenting study justification, conceptual framework, study design, and study methods

Evaluation – Winter Term (HAD6770H)

  • Class facilitation
  • Critical appraisal of a research paper
  • Draft research proposal (paper & presentation)

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HAD6761H

Course Number HAD6761H
Course Name Health Services Outcomes and Evaluation Comprehensive Course
Prerequisite Completion of required course work for PhD Health Services Outcomes and Evaluation concentration
Delivery Format One 2 hour seminar per week
Semester Offered Winter
Instructor Walter Wodchis
Description: This is a one term course designed to assist students to prepare for the IHPME PhD Health Services Outcomes and Evaluation concentration comprehensive examination. Comprehensive exam preparation is cumulative through all required courses in the IHPME PhD program. This course is focused on synthesizing cumulative materials. In this course, students summarize and integrate readings in a number of focused topics with particular attention to important theoretical and analytical issues for health services evaluation and outcomes research. The course provides a particular emphasis on conceptual frameworks and research designs for health services research.
Objectives:

  1. To ensure familiarity and understanding of health care/health services research conceptual frameworks and methodologies.
  2. To be able to evaluate and critique a research conceptual framework and research methodology.
  3. To be able to select and apply an appropriate research conceptual framework and methodology to any health services research question.
Evaluation:

In-class Seminar Facilitation 10%
Manuscript review report 10%
Final Comprehensive Exam (7-day take home exam) 80%

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HAD6762H

Course Number HAD6762H
Course Name Health Services Organization and Management Comprehensive Course
Prerequisite Completion of required course work for PhD Health Services Organization and Management concentration
Delivery Format One 2 hour seminar per week
Semester Offered Winter
Instructor Whitney Berta
Description: This course is designed to fulfill the requirement for a comprehensive exam for graduate students in the health services organization and management stream of our doctoral program
Objectives:

  1. Undertake a comprehensive review of the key concepts and theories from the management and organizational sciences literature which have been applied, or have viable application potential, to management in the health services industry,
  2. Identify and critically analyze the strengths and weakness of varying research traditions in health services management research,
  3. Critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of varying methodologies used to study managerial and organizational issues in health services management and the general organizational literature, and
  4. Prepare the student to formulate and clearly articulate relevant, topical research questions and to develop viable research designs/plans by which to pursue them.
Evaluation:

Discussion Leadership (3 x 15% each) 45%
Written Paper 55%

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HAD6763H

Course Number HAD6763H
Course Name Health Policy Comprehensive Course
Prerequisite HAD5021H
Delivery Format reading course
Semester Offered Winter
Instructor Greg Marchildon
Description: The health policy comprehensive course is the capstone course in the series of 3 health policy courses for PhD students in IHPME. The comprehensive course is primarily intended to capture the ‘breadth’ dimension of the field, and to complement the ‘depth’ expected in the thesis. This is not a ‘taught’ course. Students are expected to lead discussion of the readings with the course instructor serving as a resource for the class.
Objectives:The comprehensive examination provides the opportunity for students to demonstrate their competence in the field of health policy. Specifically, the student is expected to demonstrate:

  • A comprehensive understanding of a range of conceptual and theoretical issues relevant to health policy (including appropriate citations to the literature covered)
  • A comprehensive understanding of the structure and ongoing evolution of health systems in Canada
  • A developed ability to apply relevant concepts and theories to topical issues in health policy
  • An ability to present ideas clearly and cogently
Evaluation:

Written examination 50%
Oral examination 50%

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HAD6770H & HAD6760H

Course Number HAD6760H (Fall) & HAD6770H (Winter)
Course Name Applying Health Services Research Methods
Semester Offered Fall & Winter
Details: Please see above: HAD6760H (Fall) & HAD6770H (Winter)

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HAD7001H-F1

Course Number HAD7001H-F1
Course Name Strategic Project Management for Research
Prerequisite N/A
Delivery Format Seminar
Semester Offered Next offered Spring 2017
Instructor Alison Paprica
Description:  This course builds the capacity of students to manage their own projects and/or serve as a coordinator for large programs of research.  Students learn the basics of strategic project management that has been tailored for academic research, with an emphasis of scope, roles and responsibilities, risk, high-level scheduling and budgeting and interpersonal skills.  Each student will develop and present a project plan and contribute to a small group paper aimed at building the knowledge base for management of research.
Objectives:  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the theory behind tools and processes from the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK) Guide as they apply to research
  • Develop a high-level strategic project plan for a research project or program of research
  • Implement, monitor and control a high-level strategic project plan for a research project or program
  • Demonstrate a general understanding of the theory and practical application of the five project management process groups and ten knowledge areas described in the PMBOK Guide
Evaluation:

Presentation of scope and schedule for an external project 10%
Small group paper 30%
Individual project plan 40%
Participation 20%

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HAD7001H-S3

Course Number HAD7001H-S3
Course Name Evidence Synthesis for Health Services, Systems and Policy Research
Prerequisite N/A
Delivery Format Seminar
Semester Offered Winter 2018
Instructor Lusine Abrahamyan / Mark Dobrow / Petros Pechlivangoglou
Description: This course will help students understand the role of evidence synthesis in health services, systems and policy research and provide them with knowledge and skills to conduct systematic reviews and meta-analyses.  Particularly, students will learn how to formulate a research question for a systematic review, develop a review protocol, conduct a comprehensive search of relevant literature, evaluate the level of evidence and the quality of the studies, extract information, synthesize the evidence (using appropriate statistical methods for meta-analysis) and report the findings.  Students will also learn principles related to other approaches of evidence synthesis (e.g. critical interpretive synthesis, realist review, meta-narrative review, scoping reviews, rapid reviews, overview of reviews).  As part of the course, students will develop and register a systematic review protocol and conduct the systematic review potentially followed by a meta-analysis.  (Note: if the scope of the review is found to be not feasible within the course timelines, the student and instructors will discuss the potential of narrowing the scope to meet the course requirements).
Objectives:

  • Understand the role of evidence synthesis and the different approaches to systematic review for health services, systems and policy research
  • Become familiar with the basic concepts of traditional systematic reviews and meta-analyses for different research designs (e.g. observational studies, randomized controlled trials, economic evaluation studies)
  • Appreciate the limitations and challenges of applying evidence synthesis methods in practice by conducting a systematic review/meta-analysis
  • Acquire theoretical and practical skills to conduct systematic review and meta-analysis
Evaluation: TBD

Class Participation 10%
Protocol overview 10%
Presentation (protocol)  20%
Presentation 10%
Final paper 50%

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HAD7001H-F3

Course Number HAD7001H-F3
Course Name Health Technology Policy and Systems
Prerequisite N/A
Delivery Format Weekly lectures (3 hours)
Semester Offered Not offered fall 2017
Instructor Fiona Miller

Description:

Health technologies have complex roles in health systems, with the potential to improve health outcomes and quality of life, and to support innovative change in service delivery for more effective, sustainable and patient centred care. But though real, this potential is often not realized, due to cost or access issues, evidence limitations, the risk that technologies will prove ineffective or harmful, and related challenges of misuse, overuse or underuse. Adding to these challenges for health policy and health systems are the broader roles of technologies within political economies and public policy, given the role of science and technology in sustainable development, both locally and globally.

In these complex contexts, a variety of developmental and regulatory institutions serve as mechanisms through which public policy seeks to shape health technology development, adoption and dissemination. This course aims to help students to understand the role of health technologies whithin health systems and political economies, and the institutions and policy mechanisms that condition this role and its effects.

Objectives:

  • To understand the role of health technologies within health systems and political economies
  • To learn about institutions in Canada and internationally that have particular relevance to the development and dissemination of health technologies
  • To support critical and reflective thinking about policies and systems
Evaluation:

Participation 10%
2 open book tests (15% each) 30%
Paper 1 25%
Paper 2 35%

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HAD7001H-F4

Course Number HAD7001H-F4
Course Name How to Research, Write, Present and Defend
Prerequisite N/A
Delivery Format Lecture/Seminar once per week (3 hours)
Semester Offered Fall
Instructor Greg Marchildon / Allie Peckham

Description:

This graduate-level course is intended for students to develop and refine the skills necessary to complete a PhD or Masters thesis in a timely and proficient manner, prepare and give effective academic presentations and turn your research into publications.  The course will provide students with a range of tools, techniques and strategies to successfully research, organize, write, present, defend and publish a thesis or substantive research project.  This course offers students the opportunity to collaboratively develop and revise research questions, Gantt charts and abstracts. This course will also facilitate the creation and development of student-based networks for peer support.

This course draws on a variety of approaches to teaching and learning, including lectures, in-class activities (applied-based learning), discussion, readings, occasional guest lectures and take home assignments.  This course encourages students to “learn by doing” therefore active participation in all course activities is required.

Objectives:

  • Optimize the structure of a thesis or research paper.
  • Manage research and writing time more effectively.
  • Write directly and clearly using concise yet precise language.
  • Format and reference academic documents more efficiently with the use of referencing software.
  • Strengthen work using both self-revision and peer-review techniques.
  • Communicate research in presentations with and without visual aids.
Evaluation:

In-class participation 15%
Assignment 1 (Outline and Presentation) 25%
Assignment 2 (Presentation) 25%
Final Paper 35%

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HSR1001H

Course Number HSR1001H
Course Name Introduction to Qualitative Methods
Prerequisite None
Delivery Format Weekly, 2 hour lectures/seminar
Semester Offered Fall 2017 and Winter 2018
Instructor Michelle Nelson & Carolyn Steele Gray (fall) / Robin Hayeems & Katie Dainty (winter)

Description: In this course students will engage in the theory and practice of qualitative research.  Students will be introduced to the philosophical underpinnings of qualitative research, traditional approaches to and methods used for qualitative inquiry.  This course will place specific emphasis on applied, pragmatic approaches to qualitative research.  Coursework will draw upon strategies embedded within traditional approaches to qualitative inquiry and apply them alongside a design logic that has disciplinary relevance and is action-oriented for “practitioners” in a field (e.g. nursing, education, policy studies).  Throughout the course a range of qualitative research approaches will be discussed with examples that draw from health, health services and health policy research.  Students will work through hands-on exercises to develop proficiencies using methodological tools that are used to conduct qualitative research.

Required textbook:  Thorne, Sally.  Interpretive Description:  Qualitative Research for Applied Practice.  2nd edition

Objectives: By the end of term, students will be able to:

  • Describe the principles of qualitative research and key qualitative research traditions
  • Be familiar with applied, pragmatic approaches to qualitative research
  • Describe and apply core techniques for qualitative data collection, analysis, ensuring rigor and critical appraisal
  • Design a qualitative research project
Evaluation:

Preparation and participation 10%
Student seminar presentation 10%
Assignment One (5 pages) 30%
Assignment Two (10 pages) 40%
Final presentation (8-10 minutes) 10%

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JNH5003H

Course Number JNH5003H
Course Name Home and Community Care Knowledge Translation
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format 2 hour sessions, every 3 weeks
Semester Offered Fall
Instructor Peter Coyte
Nancy Cooper
Description: This course is designed to expose trainees to knowledge translation issues in the area of home and community care.  Participants produce a quarterly digest for decisions makers involved in planning health service provision in the community. Participants select policy and program relevant research and translate it into an accessible format for decision makers.  The course is designed to teach academic trainees how to disseminate research findings to a broad audience of policy decision makers.  Over 70 international and Canadian journals from several disciplines are reviewed.
Objectives: To provide participants with critical appraisal and knowledge translation skills in the area of home and community care.
Evaluation: There are four components to the evaluation: first, participants will attend and engage in active discussion demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the articles for potential inclusion in the quarterly digest (20%); second, participants will select, discuss and write articles for potential inclusion in each quarterly issue (20%); third, participants will produce a headline, summary and structured abstract as 1st or 2nd reviewer for each issue of the digest (20%); and finally, each participant will take on the editorial leadership for at least one issue of the digest (40%). top