Course Descriptions – MHI

Note:  Course codes that begin with HAD are shared with other IHPME degree programs. The links for them will take you to a different page.

HAD5010H: Canada’s Health System and Health Policy – Part 1
HAD5731H: Translating Leadership Into Practice
INF1003H: Information Systems, Services and Design
INF1341H: Analyzing Information Systems
INF2183H: Knowledge Management and Systems
MHI1001H: Information and Communication Technology in Health Care
MHI1002H: Complexity of Clinical Care for Non-Clinicians
MHI2001H: Health Informatics I
MHI2002H: Health Informatics II
MHI2003H: Consumer Health Informatics and Public Health Informatics
MHI2004H: Human Factors and Change Management in Health Services
MHI2005Y: Health Informatics Practicum
MHI2006H: Advanced Topics in Health Informatics (Strategic Frameworks for Solution Architecture)
MHI2007H: Quantitative Skills in Health Informatics
MHI2008H: Project Management for Health Informatics
MHI2009H: Evaluation Methods for Health Informatics
MHI2011H: Performance Measurements in Health Care: Theory and Application
MHI2015Y: Health Informatics Project
MHI3000H-F: Procurement in Health Informatics
MHI3000H-F2: Introduction to Big Data for Health
MHI3000H-F3: Interoperability Standards in Health Informatics

INF1003H

Course Number INF1003H
Course Name Information Systems, Services and Design
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Seminar
Semester Offered Fall – Session 1
Instructor Colin Furness
Description:
Fundamental perspectives and skills necessary for sound technical judgment about the place of information and communication technologies in contemporary society. Critical analysis of the design fabrication, deployment, use and maintenance of information systems and services. Analysis of modeling, architecture, implementation, inclusive access, modularity, life-cycle, and interoperability. Use of and familiarity with programming languages, databases interfaces, interactive technologies. Critical methods and analytic techniques from Science and Technology Studies and related disciplines.
Objectives:

  • Learn how computers communicate over a network based on OSI model
  • Understand the method for communicating health data
  • Understand the best practices for securing health information
  • Practice application of object-oriented methodology in health informatics
  • Translate the business requirements to UML presentation
  • Learn the methods for storage and communication of multimedia information in healthcare
  • Explain the methods for providing healthcare from remote
Evaluation:

Blackboard-based quizzes 40%
Presentation of group term assignment 20%
Group term assignment 40%
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INF1341H

Course Number INF1341H
Course Name System Analysis and Process Innovation
Prerequisite
Delivery Format
Semester Offered Fall – Session 1
Instructor A. Lapouchnian
Description:
There are numerous ways in which information technology can be used in any particular setting, with very different results. IT can be used to reduce costs and improve efficiency simply by taking advantage of the power of automation. But the increasingly diverse capabilities of IT systems can also stimulate innovative rethinking of business processes, reorganizing and simplifying work relationships and roles. Even more radically, strategic use of IT can lead to transformations in entire industries, changing the rules and business models within which customers, suppliers, partners and other stakeholders operate.In the information systems world, the system analyst acts as the intermediary between technical system developers on the one hand, and business managers and users on the other. Techniques have been developed to enable them to analyze business situations and communicate requirements to technical developers. With the rapidly changing role of IT in today’s organizations, there is also need to rethink the methods and techniques used in systems analysis. This course will cover traditional system analysis methods as well as recent developments.  Modelling approaches will include process modeling, data modeling, object modeling, and strategic modelling. Strengths and limitations of various techniques will be examined.
Objectives:
This course aims to reflect on the practice of systems analysis, both in its traditional form, and in light of recent developments. A range of modeling techniques will be exercised to support system analysis to achieve varying degrees of organizational change.
Evaluation:

Proposal for study site and sector (individual) 5%
Assignment 1:
Process automation & innovation; process & data modelling
30%
Assignment 2:
Exploring transformations; strategic modelling
30%
Assignment 3:
Insights from modelling
15%
Project Final Presentation (5% is individual mark) 15%
Class participation (individual) 5%
Prerequisite:
There are no formal course prerequisites. However, course assignments require:

  • a basic understanding of the major elements of Canada’s health care system
  • an awareness of major trends and issues (see Learning Resources below)
  • a developed ability to read and use course materials and other sources to research and write graduate-level, analytic assignments
  • developed English language (reading and writing) abilities

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INF2183H

Course Number INF2183H
Course Name Knowledge Management and Systems
Prerequisite
Delivery Format
Semester Offered Winter – Session 2
Instructor Eric Yu
Description:
Knowledge management from an information systems perspective. Analyzing information and knowledge processes in organizations. Explicit and implicit/tacit knowledge in software systems and in human social systems. Languages and models for codifying knowledge. Application of information technologies to knowledge management.  Ontologies and the semantic web.  Knowledge management in information systems development. Applications in selected areas such as enterprise management, e-commerce, healthcare, media, and education.
Objectives:
Information systems professionals are increasingly being called upon to help manage knowledge in organizations, beyond conventional information processing. A wide range of information technologies, such as document management systems, groupware, intranets, expert systems, software agents and repositories, as well as traditional information systems, are being used to support work in organizations. This course examines knowledge management from an information systems perspective.  Notions of knowledge in the management literature and in the information systems area are reviewed.  Modelling techniques that can be used during systems analysis in the context of organizational knowledge management are examined.
The course aims to expose students to the issues of knowledge management in organization and across communities, and to provide opportunities to learn and apply modelling and analytical techniques to understand the use of various types of information technologies in meeting organizational knowledge management needs.
Evaluation:

Assignment 1:
Presentation and discussion of selected readings
15%
Assignment 2:
Analyzing knowledge needs – report (1-2 person teams)
25%
Assignment 3:
Identifying knowledge management systems solutions – report (1-2 person teams)
20%
Assignment 4:
Reflections on Knowledgement Management and Systems – report (individual)
20%
Class attendance and participation is mandatory 10%

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MHI1001H

Course Number MHI1001H
Course Name Information and Communication Technology in Health Care
Prerequisite n/a (see below)
Delivery Format Weekly, 2 hours
Semester Offered Fall – Session 1
Instructor M. Millar
Description:
This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of information and communication technology to students with a health science background, but no formal training in computer or information technology. The course will cover material that is relevant to health informatics and focus on the understanding of hardware and software systems. The proper design and specification of health information systems will be emphasized. The purpose of this course is to provide the students with a sufficient background to understand the technical details of healthcare ICTs and to apply their knowledge in the design and specification of systems.
Objectives:

  • Learn how computers work, flex and data structure
  • Learn how computers communicate over a network based on OSI model
  • Understand the method for communicating health data
  • Understand the best practices for securing health information
  • Practice application of object-oriented methodology in health informatics
  • Translate the business requirements to UML representation
  • Learn the methods for storage and communication of multimedia information in healthcare
  • Explain the methods for providing healthcare from remote
Evaluation:

Portal-based quizzes 40%
Presentation of group term assignment 20%
Group term assignment 40%

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MHI1002H

Course Number MHI1002H
Course Name Complexity of Clinical Care for Non-Clinicians
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format eMHI:  Modular
MHI:  Weekly, 3 hours
Semester Offered eMHI:  Summer – Year 1
MHI:  Fall – Year 1
Instructors Gillian Strudwick
Description:
The purpose of this course is to expose non-clinicians and clinicians entering the graduate Master of Health Informatics (MHI) program at the University of Toronto to the complexity of clinical care.  This course will focus on the flow of information within and amongst patients/consumers, professionals, and between healthcare settings.  Equally, this course will provide opportunities for students to expand and reconceptualize their unique understandings of the concept of health and the health system at large.
Objectives:

  1. To enhance awareness of the complexity of clinical data collection, processing, management, and use throughout the patient/consumer encounter.
  2. To increase understanding of the unique characteristics of various patient populations, and how these characteristics impact on care delivery and information processing by multidisciplinary clinicians across settings.
  3. To increase student awareness of multidisciplinary clinician’s perceptions and interactions with information systems.
  4. To facilitate learning about the interaction between organizational processes and information handling at various clinical care settings.
  5. To expose students directly to the powerful role informatics play in clinical health care.
  6. To provide an opportunity for students to explore different facets of the health system and reconceptualise their opinions/views regarding health and healthcare.
Evaluation:

Oral presentation – Group 10%
Written assignment 10%
Oral presentation – Group 20%
Written assignment 40%
Participation – 10% seminar, 10% clinical site visits 20%

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MHI2001H

Course Number MHI2001H
Course Name Health Informatics I
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly, 3 hours
Semester Offered Fall – Session 1
Instructor Karim Keshavjee
Description:
This course is designed to provide an introduction of basic concepts and recurrent themes in Health Informatics (HI)- an emergent discipline that deals with the collection, storage, retrieval communication and use of health related data, information and knowledge. During the course we will explore a number of topics central to understanding of the field including the history of and motivation for HI, Biomedical data, information and knowledge, information systems design for the health care domain, and organizational and societal issues.
Objectives:
Students who participate in this class will get exposure to recurrent themes in Health Informatics. Students should be able to:

  1. Understand the scope and breadth of Health Informatics,
  2. Determine the essential infrastructure required for the application of information technology in health care settings,
  3. Understand how technology is used to capture, store, analyze and disseminate health and clinical information.
  4. Understand how technology is used to support decision making processes in health care.
  5. Discuss societal, organizational ethical and legal issues that surround the application of technology in health care settings.
Evaluation:

2 Group assignments – 15% each 30%
Mid-term individual paper 20%
Final paper 50%

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MHI2002H

Course Number MHI2002H
Course Name Health Informatics II
Prerequisite MHI2001H – Health Informatics I
Delivery Format Lecture / Guest Speakers
eMHI: Modular
MHI: Weekly, 3 hours
Semester Offered eMHI:  Winter – Year 1
MHI:  Winter
Instructor Aviv Shachak
Description:
Health Informatics essentially seeks to apply Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to improve all aspects of healthcare, including preventive and acute care, research, and education. This course provides an overview of applications of ICT to health care and biomedicine. Potential and actual benefits as well as the challenges associated with these applications will be discussed. Topics include Electronic Health Record (EHR) and Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE), patient care systems, telehealth, clinical Decision Support Systems (DSS) and bioinformatics.
Objectives:
At the conclusion of this course students should be able to:

  • Describe the main applications of ICT in healthcare and biomedicine, their features, uses and potential as well as actual benefits.
  • Understand and use the basic vocabulary of health informatics.
  • Assess basic technical, organizational, ethical and legal issues related to the application of ICT in healthcare settings.
  • Recognize some of the limitations and potential sources of failure or error in the design, implementation and operation of health information systems.
Evaluation:

2 Group assignments – 15% each 30%
Mid-term individual paper 20%
Final paper 50%

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MHI2003H

Course Number MHI2003H
Course Name Consumer Health Informatics and Public Health Informatics
Prerequisite MHI2001H – Health Informatics I
Delivery Format Lecture
Semester Offered Winter – Session 2
Instructor Emily Seto
Description:
Consumer health informatics has been defined as “the branch of medical informatics that analyses consumers’ needs for information; studies and implements methods of making information accessible to consumers; and models and integrates consumers’ preferences into medical information systems”. The increasing availability of health information that is accessible to consumers, most notably through the internet and related technologies, and the growing interest in personal health records accessible and/or controlled by the consumer, coincides with the desire of most consumers to assume more responsibility for their health and the pressures of costs on health systems, the emphasis on the health of populations and on prevention, and the growing desire of health professionals to realize the potential of patients and their families. The course will give an overview of how information technology and consumer health informatics are becoming an integral part of modern concepts of public health and national healthcare policies in many developed countries.Public Health Informatics has been defined as “the application of information science and technology to public health research and practice” (Friede et al. 1995). Consumer health informatics partly overlaps with this very broad definition of public health informatics, in that consumer health informatics applications directly or indirectly affect public health, and in that data from consumer health informatics applications can be used for surveillance purposes. The second part of the course will give an overview over these kinds of applications, and also touch on public health informatics applications which are not considered in a narrower sense specifically deals with population-level data collected and analyzed for or by public health professionals, for example for surveillance purposes.
Objectives:
Students who participate in this class will get exposure to the following themes in CHI and PHI:

  • Gain an overview for consumer health informatics applications and theories, and the public health angle of health informatics.
  • Compare and evaluate available consumer information technologies, recognize contemporary trends in consumer health information seeking and usage, including needs of special populations, develop an understanding of the creation of online health information sources.
  • Evaluate the quality of the information delivered on the Internet and other media, and develop an understanding for approaches and dimensions for assessing information quality. Develop a basic understanding of how consumers assess the credibility of health messages
  • Examine the impact of peer-to-peer communication
  • Get an understanding for the latest developments and issues related to personal health records, patient accessible electronic health records, patient-provider communication, patient portals
  • Examine current and future trends in the development of standardized consumer vocabularies
  • Analyze the social and ethical issues related to computerized healthcare information delivery, and analyze the change in the relationship between healthcare consumers and healthcare professionals as a result of available consumer information technologies.
  • Analyze existing and future web-based behaviour change applications for consumers, and get an understanding for the behaviour change theories used by these applications
  • Gain an understanding of public health informatics applications such as surveillance systems
Evaluation:

Class participation 10%
3 Group assignments (10% each) 30%
Midterm quiz 20%
Final paper 40%

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MHI2004H

Course Number MHI2004H
Course Name Human Factors and Change Management in Health Services
Prerequisite MHI2001H – Health Informatics I
Delivery Format Weekly, 2 hours
Semester Offered eMHI:  Winter – Year 1
MHI:  Winter
Instructor Joseph Cafazzo
Patricia Trbovich
Description:
This course will address the socio-technical challenges of introducing information and communication technology into healthcare settings. The course will cover contrasting strategies in the successful adoption and deployment of systems by introducing the fundamental concepts of human factors and the principles and strategies associated with organizational change management.The course will focus on psycho-social and behavioural issues and how they affect the design and usability considerations related to clinical applications and devices. Case examples will be utilized to demonstrate issues of human-computer interaction in clinical settings. Students will be provided with an opportunity to conduct usability testing, a clinical workflow analysis, clinical process design and engineering, and determine the potential impact of introducing online clinical information tools. End user engagement strategies to influence successful adoption of clinical information systems will also be discussed.
Objectives:
Overall, the purpose of this course is to provide the students with a sufficient background to understand the technical, organizational and individual issues associated with the changes related to the introduction of clinical computing solutions.
Evaluation:

Participation and attendance 10%
Case study group presentations 20%
Clinical workflow analysis or usability paper 30%
Final paper 40%

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MHI2005Y

Course Number MHI2005Y
Course Name Health Informatics Practicum
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Workshops plus 600 hour practicum placement
Semester Offered Fall – Session 1 start (full year)
Instructor Julia Zarb
Description:
The required practicum will provide an opportunity to apply the theory and knowledge gained in course work directly in a health care related organization. Students are required to spend a minimum of 600 hours involved in appropriate, supervised field practice for 2.0 FCE. While it cannot be guaranteed to students, the professional status of the MHI is recognized within the industry and we will endeavour to seek practicum arrangements that offer paid positions. Some examples of positions that may be available in a Health Informatics practicum include Health Information Analysts, Technical Specialists, Technical Architects, Program Coordinators, Project Managers, Special Projects and Team Participants. Examples of HI skills that would be practiced include knowledge of computer and technical applications in health care, pharmaceutical, finance, human resources and telecommunications; problem solving in software engineering, change management or project management, corporate strategizing, facilitation, resolution and crisis management; management skills such as facilitating team effectiveness; leadership through participation and contribution on project teams or committees; communication skills; increase job knowledge; and writing and/or reporting skills. Throughout the practicum the students are expected to record and reflect upon their experiences and to engage in regular discussion with their practicum supervisor. The practicum evaluation is based on the student’s performance plus a scholarly, analytical and reflective report drawing on the experience, and a presentation to their classmates.top

MHI2006H

Course Number MHI2006H
Course Name Advanced Topics in Health Informatics (Strategic Frameworks for Solution Architecture)
Prerequisite MHI2001H – Health Informatics I,
MHI2002H – Health Informatics II, and
MHI2005Y – Health Informatics Practicum
Delivery Format Weekly
Semester Offered Fall – Session 4
Instructor Julia Zarb
Description:
This capstone course is designed for students to apply critical thinking and knowledge built throughout the MHI program to the process of engaging theoretical frameworks for solution architecture within real-world situations. The goal is for students to gain experience in translating knowledge through strategic and best-practice based methods to address ‘wicked problems’ currently experienced within the eHealth community.
Objectives:
Students will enhance abilities to flow MHI learning through strategic frameworks that enable effective short and long-range problem solving in working situations.

  1. Discovery of environmental impacts:  Working as a group and individually, students will collaborate to identify and articulate relevant issues effecting the uptake of eHealth technologies and related processes.
  2. Distillation of strategic insights: Students will leverage evidence and best practices to analyze, synthesize and integrate research and a range of knowledge into real-world strategies.
  3. Development of strategic directions: The team will collaborate to produce viable strategic frameworks that address key drivers and disruptors within the eHealth environment.
Evaluation:

Individual assignments 30%
Group assignments 30%
Group and class participation 5%
Final presentation 35%

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MHI2007H

Course Number MHI2007H
Course Name Quantitative Skills in Health Informatics
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly, 3 hours
Semester Offered eMHI: Fall – Session 1
MHI: Winter – Session 2
Instructor Olesya. Falenchuk
Description:
This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of selected statistical analysis techniques relevant to health services research. Specifically, the course covers intermediate statistical methods normally found in research and work applications: analysis of variance for one-way and multi-way data with fixed, mixed and random effects models; linear and multiple regression; multiple correlation, analysis of covariance, repeated-measures analyses. In addition, students will learn about survey sampling, experimental design, and power analysis. The emphasis will be placed on conceptual understanding of statistical techniques and their application to address real problems.
Evaluation:

In-class Quizzes (3 x 10% each) 30%
Portfolio of the results and interpretations of statistical anlayses 40%
Final Exam 30%

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MHI2008H

Course Number MHI2008H
Course Name Project Management for Health Informatics
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format on-line and three in-person sessions
Semester Offered Summer – Session 3
Instructor James Mullen

Description:

This course provides students with an introduction to the theory and practice of project management. It is intended to give students grounding in project management techniques as a preparation for participation in practice. The emphasis will be on practice versus theory; but, grounding in theoretical concepts is important to the Health Informatics Professional as well.

This course is intended to prepare students to participate in, contribute to, lead, and succeed in future health informatics projects. Students will combine past of current experiences in projects together with insights from the course textbook and complimentary readings to develop new understandings and knowledge. In addition, this course is intended to integrate concepts learned in other foundational courses in the Health Informatics programme.

Objectives:

  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of project management principles and practices;
  • Apply basic project management techniques and choose the appropriate project management supporting tools, and;
  • Function effectively on a project team of any size and as a project manager for small to medium sized projects.
Evaluation:

Participation 15%
Individual Assignments 45%
Group Assignment 40%

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MHI2009H

Course Number MHI2009H
Course Name Evaluation Methods for Health Informatics
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly, 3 hours
Semester Offered Fall – Session 1
Instructor David Wiljer
Description:
There is little debate that health information systems have transformed clinical practice and the patient experience. Health information systems hold the promise of improving the flow of information, the coordination and integration of services, and the quality and safety of care. These systems, however, are often imperfect solutions implemented in complex environments. The true impact of health information systems on the health care system still remains relatively unknown.  For the many implementations of health information systems, there are relatively few evaluations and a paucity of high quality research studies to assess the impact of health information systems within a wide range of contexts.This course is designed to demystify the evaluation process and give you the tools that you need to build a solid evaluation plan for every new eHealth project that you work on.
Objectives:

  1. Understand the various approaches, tools and techniques used to evaluate health information systems.
  2. Appropriately apply evaluation and research tools required to implement an evaluation plan.
  3. Formulate and assess the merits of a health information system evaluation plan based on project objectives and goals.
Evaluation:

Study critique (individual) 20%
Case study leadership (group & individual) 15%
Class participation 10%
Final evaluation plan oral (group) 25%
Final evaluation plan written (group) 30%

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MHI2011H

Course Number MHI2011H
Course Name Performance Measurements in Health Care: Theory and Application
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format eMHI:  Modular
MHI:  Modular
Semester Offered Fall – Session 2
Instructor Mark Dobrow
Description:
The goal of the course is to help students gain a better understanding of performance measurement in health care and the importance of health informatics in supporting performance measurement systems. The course will provide an overview of different models for performance measurement, indicator development strategies and a discussion of issues specific to several stakeholder groups.
Objectives:

  1. To understand performance measurement frameworks and models that are currently being applied across the health care system, when and why to implement them (what to measure and why).
  2. To describe different methods for identifying, selecting and validating specific types of performance measures (how to measure).
  3. To become familiar with emerging issues in the calculation, reporting, and uptake of individual components of performance measurement frameworks by a range of stakeholder groups and in a variety of healthcare settings (appropriateness, feasibility, and relevance of measures and frameworks).
Evaluation:

Individual assignment 20%
Individual – article critique 25%
Group project 45%
Group discussion on the class readings 5%
Participation (in weekly classes) 5%

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MHI2015Y

Course Number MHI2015Y
Course Name Health Informatics Project
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Working sessions and small group meetings
Semester Offered Full year (year 1: EMHI)
Instructor Julia Zarb
Description:
The Health Informatics Project course is designed on a consulting model to develop and deliver a project into each student’s place of employment. Healthcare leaders work alongside the instructor to mentor students in project development prior to onsite execution. The course requires approximately 400 hours of applied practice in a work setting and represents 1.5 credits in the MHI degree.
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MHI3000H-F

Course Number MHI3000H-F
Course Name Procurement in Health Informatics
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly, 2 hours
Semester Offered Not offered in 2017
Instructor TBD
Description:
This course is designed to provide an introduction of basic concepts and recurrent themes related to public law and procurement within the field of health informatics – a discipline that focuses on budgetary constraints, vendor relationships, strategic planning, negotiation, and contractual obligations. During this course we will explore a number of topics related to the procurement process within the provincial landscape. Critical analysis of recent high profile procurements will also be undertaken.
Objectives:
The goal of this course is to facilitate the development of knowledge and skills in the areas of procurement, health information systems, vendor management, financial oversight, and healthcare. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand provincial and federal laws related to the broader public sector (BPS) procurement directives
  • Identify organizational and legal risks and issues that surround the procurement process within the healthcare setting
  • Understand the different types of procurement vehicles that exist and when they are utilized
  • Determine the essential components required within contracts related to information and communication technologies (ICT)
  • Understand the end-to-end procurement process
  • Understand key decision making aspects in the analysis and selection of health informatics systems and vendors
  • Discuss policies and processes to ensure appropriate financial oversight of public sector contracts and procurements
  • Recognize the limitations and some of the potential sources of failure or error in the design and evaluation of health informatics related procurements

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MHI3000H-F2

Course Number MHI3000H-F2
Course Name Introduction to Big Data for Health
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly, 3 hours
Semester Offered Fall – Session 4
Instructor Dennis Cheung
David Henry
Description:
Introduction to Big Data for Health is a new elective course intended to introduce students to the many types of data and analytical methods now available that will enhance our ability to investigate and explain the health of communities. These include data that are relevant to measurement of the social economic and genetic determinants of health, the quality and outcomes of healthcare programs and healthcare interventions.  The quantity and variety of relevant data have increased substantially in the last decade and now include data from: healthcare administration, electronic medical records, diagnostic laboratories, censuses, vital statistics, environmental exposures, disease and device registries, research data-bases and bio-repositories. To this may be added relevant information extracted from social services, taxation records, education, justice and corrections services. This is a rapidly changing field. The aims of the course are to introduce students to the different types of data, to provide an overview of the different analytical approaches and to assess the potential value of these big data-sets by examining a number of examples of their use.
Objectives:
The aims of the course are to provide students with an overview of the different types of data, the different analytical approaches and to assess the potential value of these big data-sets by examining a number of examples of their use.

  • Taxonomy of health data, characteristics of structured and unstructured health data
  • The value of individually linked data
  • Different analytic approaches to ‘wide’ and ‘deep’ data
  • Data security and privacy, data sharing, de-identification and governance
  • Working with distributed data networks
  • Examples of the use of big data in health and healthcare
  • Examples of the use of big data in policy evaluation

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MHI3000H-F3

Course Number MHI3000H-F3
Course Name Interoperability Standards in Health Informatics
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly, 2 hours
Semester Offered Fall – Session 4
Instructor Dennis Cheung
Description:
This course provides students with an introduction to the various interoperability standards available and in use throughout the health informatics community. This course is intended to give students the grounding principles behind how data is exchanged, linked, and integrated across various healthcare information systems and provide students insight into the inner workings of electronic health records (EHR’s).This course is intended to prepare students to participate in, contribute to, lead, and succeed in future health informatics projects. Students will combine past or current experiences in projects together with insights from the course readings to develop new understandings and knowledge. In addition, this course is intended to integrate concepts learned in other foundational courses in the Health Informatics program to enhance the students understanding of EHRs.
Objectives:
The aim of the course is to prepare students to participate in, contribute to, lead, and succeed in future health informatics projects.

  • Demonstrate working knowledge and understanding of the various interoperability standards present in health informatics (i.e. HL7, SNOMED-CT, LONIC, ICD-10-CA, DICOM, etc.)
  • Awareness of the various standards organizations and initiatives (i.e. CIHI, Canada Health Infoway, etc…)
  • Gain awareness of the challenges and obstacles that exist in the implementation of EHRs
  • Understanding of the standards and software development life-cycle
  • Knowledge of Governance Models, decision making processes, and stakeholder engagement activities related to the development of interoperability standards
  • Gain a basic understanding of architecture and why standards play a major role in planning/ implementation activities
  • Ability to apply the correct standards to the development and procurement of health information applications and systems
  • Promote the enabling of data exchange and linkage of data across various data holdings

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