GMA

Course Descriptions – MHI

Note:  Course codes that begin with HAD are shared with other IHPME degree programs. The links for them will take you to a different page.

HAD5010H: Canada’s Health System and Health Policy – Part 1
HAD5731H: Translating Leadership Into Practice
HAD7001H-F: Applied Machine Learning for Health Data
INF1003H: Information Systems, Services and Design
INF1341H: Analyzing Information Systems
INF2183H: Knowledge Management and Systems
MHI1001H: Information and Communication Technology in Health Care
MHI1002H: Complexity of Clinical Care for Non-Clinicians
MHI2001H: Fundamentals of Health Informatics
MHI2002H: Emergent Topics in Health Informatics: Intelligent Medicine, Machine Learning and Knowledge Representation
MHI2003H: Emerging Applications in Consumer, Public and Global Health Informatics
MHI2004H: Human Factors and System Design in Health Care
MHI2005Y: Health Informatics Practicum
MHI2006H: Advanced Topics in Health Informatics (Strategic Frameworks for Solution Architecture)
MHI2007H: Quantitative Skills in Health Informatics
MHI2008H: Project Management for Health Informatics
MHI2009H: Evaluation Methods for Health Informatics
MHI2010H: Health Informatics Practicum Extension
MHI2011H: Performance Measurements in Health Care: Theory and Application
MHI2015Y: Health Informatics Project
MHI2016H: Health Informatics Project Extension
MHI2017H: Systems Analysis & Process Innovation in Healthcare
MHI2018H: Knowledge Management and Systems
MHI2013H: Data Visualization in Health Care
MHI2012H: Introduction to Big Data for Health
MHI3000H-F3: Interoperability Standards in Health Informatics

HAD5010H

Course Number HAD5010H
Course Name Canada’s Health System and Health Policy – Part 1
Prerequisite n/a (see below)
Delivery Format Weekly, 2 hours
Semester Offered Fall – Session 4
Instructor Kerry Kuluski
Description:
Health care remains a top policy priority in Canada and a key defining characteristic of Canadian identity. Under Canada’s universal, publicly‐funded health insurance plan (Medicare), all Canadians have access to medically necessary hospital and doctor care regardless of the ability to pay.Yet, like health systems across the industrialized world, Canada’s faces growing challenges. An aging and increasingly diverse population, global pandemics, emerging and more costly medical technologies and drugs, and rising public expectations about timely access to care, put additional demands on already stretched health care resources. The site of care is shifting as more care moves out of hospitals and into home and community. Individuals and communities are demanding a greater role in decision-making. There are increasing pressures to harmonize domestic health care policies with global “benchmarks.” In spite of billions of new health care dollars, public concerns about wait times for non‐emergency care continue to fuel debate about health system sustainability and the need for private pay care options.HAD5010 (and HAD5011, its counterpart for students in the Msc and PhD research stream) is the first of two courses which develop and apply a policy analysis “tool kit” to critically analyze key issues and trends in Canada’s health care system and health policy. Course sections examine the current state of health care in Canada, the public-private mix, the influence of powerful interest groups, and the determinants of health, paying particular attention to the ideas, interests, and institutions which have shaped the Canadian health care system in the past and which now shape its future.This graduate course is designed for health professionals and students of health policy who need to “make sense” of a rapidly changing and increasingly politicized health care environment in which “evidence” is often only one factor driving the pace and direction of change.
Learner Objectives:
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify major elements of Canada’s health care system
  • Explain current health policy issues and trends in Canada and internationally
  • Apply a conceptual policy analysis toolkit to “make sense” of a volatile health policy environment
  • Write short, concise briefing notes which synthesize academic articles, policy papers and reports as the basis for evaluating and recommending policy options
  •  Value the need for a policy analytic approach

Learner Competencies:
(Competencies refer to the National Centre for Healthcare Leadership Comptency Model)

  • Analytical Thinking
  • Communication Skills
  • Information Seeking
  • Initiative
  • Innovative Thinking
  • Self-Confidence

Evaluation:

Participation 10%
Briefing Note 1 10%
Briefing Note 2 20%
Briefing Note 3 20%
One page outline – Summary of Policy Talk 5%
Policy talk 15%
Short paper based on policy talk 20%

Prerequisite:
There are no formal course prerequisites. However, course assignments require:

  • A basic understanding of the major elements of Canada’s health care system
  • An awareness of major health care trends and issues
  • A developed ability to read and use course materials and other sources to research and write graduate-level, analytic assignments
  • Developed English language abilities

Please note: Students who feel they are weak in any of these areas should consult their Program Director about other curriculum options.

HAD5731H

Course Number HAD5731H
Course Name Translating Leadership into Practice
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Modular Format
Semester Offered Fall
Instructor Tina Smith
Description:
This is the first of two courses that explore the art and exercise of leadership in the healthcare sector.  In Part 1 we examine what it means to be a leader moving from personal mastery of leadership behaviors to leading change at the organizational level.  The course uses the four competencies of Goleman’s Emotional Intelligence model as a framework, progressing from a focus on self-assessment and self-management to one of social awareness and relationship management. You cannot lead others until you know who you are, what you believe in, and why someone might want to follow you; and conversely, others will not follow you if do not understand their motivations, values and concerns and are not able to manage your relationships with them. In other words, we must first understand and manage ourselves, before we can understand and successfully manage our relationships with others.This course is designed to ensure that learners appreciate the vital role leadership plays, at all levels of the organizations, in managing and sustaining change for improved health outcomes and performance. Each course module is designed to provide a set of evidence-based learning experiences that will facilitate your leadership development through reflection, practice and the formation of action goals.  Topics covered include the five practices of exemplary leadership; change leadership; influence and impact; communication and dialogue; motivation and accountability.Leadership development is a life-long journey; it is the overall objective of this course to provide you with the tools and insights to begin that journey.
Learner Objectives:
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Invite feedback from a variety of sources A3 – Valuing.
  • Indicate their leadership development needs and construct a set of goals that are challenging but achievable. C6 –Evaluation and C5 – Synthesis.
  • Clarify and Express their fundamental values and beliefs A3 – Valuing.
  • Identify and align actions to shared values C4 – Analysis.
  •  Describe their image of the future and inspire others to share a common vision A3 – Valuing.
  • Recognize opportunities to challenge the status-quo and improve performance C4 – Analysis.
  • Create a climate in which people are willing to innovate and learn from mistakes C5 – Synthesis.
  • Build collaboration, teamwork, and trust C5 – Synthesis.
  • Identify actions that allow others to excel in their work C4 – Analysis.
  • Recognize the accomplishment of others in ways that are meaningful to them C4 – Analysis.
  • Explain diverse points of view by actively listening to both emotion and content A4 – Organization.
  • Exhibit responsibility for their own performance A3 – Valuing.
  • Develop critical approaches for constructive negotiation and conflict management strategies C5 – Synthesis.
  • Diagnose issues and resolve same using influence strategies C6 – Evaluation.
  • Plan and execute an organizational change C5 – Synthesis.

Learner Competencies:

  • Accountability L1.3 – Demands High Performance.
  • Achievement Orientation – L2.4 – Sets to Work and Meet Challenging Goals.
  • Change Leadership – L4.1 – Identifies Areas for Change, L4.4 – Challenges the Status Quo.
  • Collaboration – L5.4 – Encourages Others, L5.5 – Builds Team Commitment.
  • Impact and Influence – L10.4 – Calculates Impact of Actions or Words.
  • Information Seeking – L11.4 – Conducts Research to Maintain Knowledge.
  • Interpersonal Understanding – L15.2 – Interprets Emotions and Verbal Content, L15.3 – Commits to Understanding Others.
  • Organizational Awareness – L16.4 – Considers Priorities and Values of Multiple Constituencies.
  • Professionalism – L19.1 – Acts Openly and Honestly, L19.2 – Promotes Organizational Integrity, L19.4 – Maintains Social Accountability.
  • Self-Development – L23.1 – Seeks Feedback, L23.3 – Considers the Impact One Has on Others.
  • Talent Development – L25. 3 – Provides Constructive Feedback and Support.
  • Team Leadership – L26.3 – Promotes Team Effectiveness, L26.5 – Demonstrates Leadership.

Evaluation:

Reflecting on your LPI – Individual Paper 20%
Leading change – Individual Paper 30%
Revisiting change – Individual Paper 40%
Class Participation 10%

HAD7001H-F

Course Number HAD7001H-F
Course Name Applied Machine Learning for Health Data
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly, 3 hours
Semester Offered Fall
Instructor Nicholas Mitsakakis
Description:
This will be a weekly course that will introduce topics and methods of Health Data Science Analytics, an emerging discipline at the intersection of biostatistics, computer science and health that aims to generate knowledge to solve complex health problems through the analysis of (big) data. The focus will be on applied machine learning methods, covering applications of prediction, classification and clustering, using simulated and real health data. The R statistical software system will be used. While a sufficient theoretical background will be presented, the emphasis will be on practical examples and applications using health data. Each weekly session will be divided into 1.5 hours lecture and 1.5 hours
hands-on tutorial.
Learner Objectives:
The objective of this course is to provide students with a sound understanding of some of the methods used in Health Data Science analytics, focusing on the practical application of machine learning methods to large health data.

INF1003H

Course Number INF1003H
Course Name Information Systems, Services and Design
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format MHI – Weekly
EMHI – Modular
Semester Offered Fall – Session 1
Instructor Colin Furness
Description:
Information systems permeate seemingly all aspects of both work and play. One of the greatest drawbacks in the use of such technologies, however, is poor technological literacy among system owners and users alike: a tendency to unbridled enthusiasm for what information systems can do, but without concomitant reflection on their limitations, and critical implications of how they are designed
and why they are used.This course will orient students to fundamental perspectives necessary for sound technical judgement about the place of information and communication technologies in contemporary society. A balance of theory and practical perspectives is sought. On the theoretical side, three interrelated themes are developed: the structure of information systems, the design of information systems, and the social implications of information systems. The practical side is developed through assignments (data modelling, information systems assessment, and systems development planning).

Learner Objectives:

Students will develop an understanding of how information systems work, to be able to appreciate their capabilities and limitations. At the end of the course, students will be able to:

Theoretical Objectives:

  • Know the origins and evolution of IS.
  • Understand the function and structure of networks and databases.
  • Describe systems development methods.
  • Discuss how to measure IS quality.
  • Appreciate multiple ethical issues in the deployment of IS, both in and out of workplaces.
  • Articulate the challenges and limitations of electronic support of group activities.

Practical Objectives:

  • Demonstrate data modelling skills in constructing entity-relationship diagrams and data flow diagrams.
  • Describe how to systematically evaluate an existing information system.
  • Demonstrate an ability to author a Request for Proposals document.
  • Participate meaningfully in the planning process for an IS design and implementation.
Evaluation:

Blackboard-based quizzes 40%
Presentation of group term assignment 20%
Group term assignment 40%
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MHI1001H

Course Number MHI1001H
Course Name Information and Communication Technology for Health Care
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly (3hrs)
Semester Offered Fall – Session 1
Instructor Michael Millar
Description:
This course will introduce the fundamental concepts of information and communication technology for those students with a health science background, but no formal training in computer or information technology. The course will cover material that is relevant to health informatics and focus on the understanding of hardware and software systems. We will emphasize on the proper design and specification of health
information systems. We will provide you a sufficient background to understand the technical details of healthcare ICTs and apply this knowledge in the design and specification of systems.
Course Goals:

  • Learn how computers work, as well as file and data structure.
  • Learn how computers and applications communicate over a network.
  • Understand the methods and constraints for communicating health data.
  • Learn the methods for storage and communication of multimedia information in healthcare.
  • Explain the methods and constraints for providing remote healthcare.
  • Understand the best practices for securing health information.
  • Explain how technology is developed, implemented and maintained in healthcare institutions.
  • Understand key modelling standards used in the management of health technology.

Learner Objectives:
Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the usage of computer networks for distributed health services.
  • Discuss advanced health technology concepts with stakeholders.
  • Model a computerized solution for a decentralized healthcare process
Evaluation:

Portal-based quizzes 40%
Presentation of group term assignment 20%
Group term assignment 40%

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MHI1002H

Course Number MHI1002H
Course Name Complexity of Clinical Care for Non-Clinicians
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format eMHI: Modular
MHI:  Weekly, 3 hours
Semester Offered eMHI:  Summer – Year 1
MHI:  Fall – Year 1
Instructors Gillian Strudwick
Description:
In Complexity of Clinical Care, the implications and practical application of the outputs of AI and Machine learning are discussed in class, and in select assigned readings. This class provides an overview of how clinicians can use the outputs of these methods to benefit clinical care. Students complete an assignment where they shadow a clinician and learn about some of the clinical challenges and questions
experienced by the clinician. In a final assignment, students propose solutions to these observed challenges and questions. These solutions may require AI and/or machine learning methods.
Learner Objectives:

  • Enhance understanding of the structure and function of the Canadian healthcare system and roles of various health professionals.
  • Improve awareness and understanding of the complexity of clinical data collection, processing, management, and use, throughout the patient/consumer-health professional encounter.
  • Understand the culture of healthcare, and how culture may influence care delivery and information processing by health professionals across settings.
  • Increase awareness of health professionals’ experience with information systems and barriers to successful adoption.
  • Appreciate the interaction among organizational processes, information sharing and impact on care delivery and health professionals experience in various clinical care settings.
  • Enhance understanding of the powerful role that informatics plays in clinical healthcare.
Evaluation:

Oral presentation – Group 10%
Written assignment 10%
Oral presentation – Group 20%
Written assignment 40%
Participation – 10% seminar, 10% clinical site visits 20%

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MHI2001H

Course Number MHI2001H
Course Name Fundamentals of Health Informatics
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly, 3 hours
Semester Offered Fall – Session 1
Instructor Karim Keshavjee
Aviv Shachak
Description:
This course is designed to provide an introduction of basic concepts and recurrent themes in Health Informatics (HI)- an emergent discipline that deals with the collection, storage, retrieval communication and use of health-related data, information and knowledge. During the course we will explore a number of topics central to understanding of the field including the motivation for HI; Biomedical data, information and knowledge; technological support for decision making (including predictive analytics, machine learning and artificial intelligence); the main types of information systems in health care and their design; and organizational and societal issues.
Learner Objectives:
Students who participate in this class will get exposure to recurrent themes and IT applications in Health Informatics. Students should be able to:

  • Understand the scope and breadth of Health Informatics.
  • Understand how information and communication technology can be used to capture, store, analyze, and disseminate health and clinical information in order to improve quality, safety and efficiency.
  • Understand how technology may be used to support decision-making processes in health care.
  • Apply theoretical concepts from social and information sciences in the design, implementation and evaluation of health informatics initiatives.
  • Discuss societal, organizational and ethical issues that surround the application of technology in health care settings.
  • Be able to analyze health informatics initiatives and discuss their strengths and weaknesses.
Evaluation:

2 Group assignments – 15% each 30%
Mid-term individual paper 20%
Final paper 50%

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MHI2002H

Course Number MHI2002H
Course Name Emergent Topics in Health Informatics: Intelligent Medicine, Machine Learning and Knowledge Representation
Prerequisite MHI2001H – Health Informatics I
Delivery Format Lecture / Guest Speakers
Modular
Semester Offered Winter
Instructor Ali Esensoy
Elham Dolatabadi
Description:
Health Informatics essentially seeks to apply information technology to solve key problems and improve all aspects of healthcare, including primary and acute care, research, and education. Topics in the course focus on the management of information technology, and the knowledge it produces including fundamental concepts of data structure, quality, analytics and aggregation, as well as data visualization. Personalized and intelligent medicine will be explored, and the ethics and societal implications of AI will be addressed. The course provides an interdisciplinary perspective of AI stakeholder values, intelligent medicine, machine learning, and knowledge representation. Students will learn when and how it is appropriate to apply machine learning for the improvement of health and healthcare. Applied, handson, and conceptual AI content will be explored in depth.
Learner Objectives:
Students who participate in this class will get exposure to recurrent themes in Health Informatics. Students should be able to:

  • List and describe key problems and opportunities in health care that require or could benefit from health information technology.
  • Name and describe key eHealth technologies currently being employed to solve the key problems or realize important benefits.
  • Name and explain key models and frameworks used for the design, deployment and management of eHealth systems.
  • Analyze why eHealth technologies fail to provide the promised benefits.
  • Design an eHealth technology to solve a specific problem in health informatics.
Evaluation:

2 Group assignments – 15% each 30%
Mid-term individual paper 20%
Final paper 50%

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MHI2003H

Course Number MHI2003H
Course Name Emerging Applications in Consumer, Public and Global Health Informatics
Prerequisite MHI2001H – Health Informatics I
Delivery Format Lecture
Semester Offered Winter – Session 2
Instructor Emily Seto
Chitra Lalloo
Description:
Health informatics (HI) has traditionally been focused on technology for healthcare providers. However, HI is now transforming healthcare on many other fronts, such as by addressing consumers’ needs for health information (i.e., consumer health informatics). This course will provide students with an overview of the role of consumer health informatics in changing the face of our healthcare system. Consumer health informatics trends and applications such as artificial intelligence, will the explored, and relevant theoretical frameworks for the creation of consumer health informatics will be reviewed.Another emerging area of HI is public health informatics. This is the application of information and communication technology to the field of public health to support and enhance public health practice and business processes, with the ultimate goal of improving population health. The course will provide students with an overview of the function and activities of public health agencies and authorities in Canada, which will allow for a better understanding of the need and uses of technology in public health practice and research for syndromic surveillance, immunization management, etc.Populations around the world face different health challenges and live within different healthcare systems. This course will provide examples of the use of HI to improve health in various regions across the world (i.e., global health informatics). This will provide students with a broad perspective of the potential applications of HI appropriate for populations around the world.An overarching theme throughout the course will be the ethical and societal impact of consumer, public,
and global health informatics.
Learner Objectives:
Students will:

  • Gain an understanding of the breadth, relevance, and emerging trends of consumer, public, and global health informatics applications in improving health and healthcare.
  • Examine and analyze select current consumer, public and global health informatics projects underway nationally and internationally.
  • Compare and evaluate current consumer information technologies.
  • Gain an understanding of the role of health information systems, such as disease registries and surveillance systems in supporting and enhancing public health activities and improving population health.
  • Gain an understanding of the structure, function and activities of public health agencies in Canada.
Evaluation:

Class participation 10%
3 Group assignments (10% each) 30%
Midterm quiz 20%
Final paper 40%

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MHI2004H

Course Number MHI2004H
Course Name Human Factors and System Design in Health Care
Prerequisite MHI2001H – Health Informatics I
Delivery Format Weekly, 2 hours
Semester Offered eMHI:  Winter – Year 1
MHI:  Winter
Instructor Joseph Cafazzo
Shivani Goyal
Description:
This course will address the socio-technical challenges of introducing information and communication technology into healthcare settings. The course will cover contrasting strategies in the successful adoption and deployment of systems by introducing the fundamental concepts of human factors and the principles and strategies associated with organizational change management. The course will focus on psycho-social and behavioural issues and how they affect the design and usability considerations related to clinical applications and devices. Students will learn about how artificial intelligence can be used to support individual behaviour change and its application in precision medicine and personalized
care. Case examples will be utilized to demonstrate issues of human-computer interaction in clinical settings. Students will be provided with an opportunity to conduct usability testing, a clinical workflow analysis, clinical process design and engineering, and determine the potential impact of introducing online clinical information tools. End user engagement strategies to influence successful adoption of clinical information systems will also be discussed.
Learner Objectives:

  • Adoption of ICTs in complex socio-technical environments.
  • Human factors principles – Cognition, human performance and behaviour.
  • Human factors and Human-Computer interaction (HCI) – Mental models, iterative user-centered design and methods.
  • Clinical and departmental workflow analysis.
  • Process design and engineering in relation to the introduction of clinical computing Assessing cultural readiness within organizations.
  • Integration of ICT’s into clinical practice settings and related strategies.
  • Determining an effective device strategy for the deployment of clinical information systems.
  • Structures to support organizational change including supporting roles and communication tools.
  • End user engagement to secure probability of buy-in and successful implementation of clinical information systems.
  • Technical, organizational, and individual issue management – Change leadership, disruptive technologies, innovators, diffusion of innovation.
Evaluation:

Participation and attendance 10%
Case study group presentations 20%
Clinical workflow analysis or usability paper 30%
Final paper 40%

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MHI2005Y

Course Number MHI2005Y
Course Name Health Informatics Practicum
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Workshops plus 600 hour practicum placement
Semester Offered Fall – Session 1 start (full year)
Instructor Cristina Tassone
Description:
The required practicum will provide an opportunity to apply the theory and knowledge gained in course work directly in a health care related organization. Students are required to spend a minimum of 600 hours involved in appropriate, supervised field practice for 2.0 FCE. While it cannot be guaranteed to students, the professional status of the MHI is recognized within the industry and we will endeavour to seek practicum arrangements that offer paid positions. Some examples of positions that may be available in a Health Informatics practicum include Health Information Analysts, Technical Specialists, Technical Architects, Program Coordinators, Project Managers, Special Projects and Team Participants. Examples of HI skills that would be practiced include knowledge of computer and technical applications in health care, pharmaceutical, finance, human resources and telecommunications; problem solving in software engineering, change management or project management, corporate strategizing, facilitation, resolution and crisis management; management skills such as facilitating team effectiveness; leadership through participation and contribution on project teams or committees; communication skills; increase job knowledge; and writing and/or reporting skills. Throughout the practicum the students are expected to record and reflect upon their experiences and to engage in regular discussion with their practicum supervisor. While it cannot be guaranteed to students, the professional status of the MHI is recognized within the industry and we will endeavor to seek practicum arrangements that offer paid positions.top

MHI2006H

Course Number MHI2006H
Course Name Advanced Topics in Health Informatics (Strategic Frameworks for Solution Architecture)
Prerequisite MHI2001H – Health Informatics I,
MHI2002H – Health Informatics II, and
MHI2005Y – Health Informatics Practicum
Delivery Format Weekly
Semester Offered Fall – Session 4
Instructor Julia Zarb
Darren Larsen
Description:
This capstone course is designed for students to apply critical thinking and knowledge built throughout the MHI program to the process of engaging theoretical frameworks for solution architecture within real-world situations. The goal is for students to gain experience in translating knowledge through strategic and best-practice based methods to address ‘wicked problems’ currently experienced within the informatics spectrum, ranging from the challenges of existing implementations to meeting the potential for AI in healthcare. Guests are subject matter experts bringing such cases as AI and ethics, policy and hospital governance, and healthcare communications. Capstone projects include
opportunities to problem solve in live settings, to explore solutions with public and private sector interdisciplinary case partners.
Learner Objectives:
Students will learn to employ strategic thinking to navigate ‘wicked problems’ currently experienced with health systems. Students will enhance abilities to apply MHI learning via strategic frameworks that enable effective short and long-range problem solving in working situations.

  • Discovery of environmental impacts: Working as a group and individually, students will collaborate to identify and articulate relevant issues effecting the uptake of digital health technologies and related processes.
  • Distillation of strategic insights: Students will leverage their MHI competencies developed to date, evidence and best practices to synthesize and integrate research and a range of knowledge, including grey literature, as it relates to proposing viable solutions.
  • Development of strategic directions: Students will collaborate to produce viable and pragmatic case responses and capstone project deliverables that address key drivers and disruptors within a real-world context.
Evaluation:

Individual assignments 30%
Group assignments 30%
Group and class participation 5%
Final presentation 35%

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MHI2007H

Course Number MHI2007H
Course Name Quantitative Skills in Health Informatics
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly, 3 hours
Semester Offered eMHI: Fall – Session 1
MHI: Winter – Session 2
Instructor Olesya Falenchuk
Description:
This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of selected statistical analysis techniques relevant to health services research. Specifically, the course covers intermediate statistical methods normally found in research and work applications: analysis of variance for one-way and multi-way data with fixed, mixed and random effects models; linear and multiple regression; multiple correlation, analysis of covariance, repeated-measures analyses. In addition, students will learn about survey sampling, experimental design, and power analysis. The emphasis will be placed on conceptual understanding of statistical techniques and their application to address real problems.
Evaluation (EMHI):

In-class Quizzes (3 x 10% each) 30%
Portfolio of the results and interpretations of statistical anlayses 40%
Final Exam 30%

Evaluation (MHI):

In-class Quizzes (10 x 5% each) 50%
Course project (2 parts, 25% each) 50%

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MHI2008H

Course Number MHI2008H
Course Name Project Management for Health Informatics
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format online and three in-person sessions
Semester Offered Summer – Session 3
Instructor Dennis Cheung (MHI stream)
Giuseppe Cammisa & Anna Chyjek (EMHI stream)

Description:

This course provides students with an introduction to the theory and practice of project management. It is intended to give students grounding in project management techniques as a preparation for participation in practice. The emphasis will be on practice versus theory; but, grounding in theoretical concepts is important to the Health Informatics Professional as well.

This course is intended to prepare students to participate in, contribute to, lead, and succeed in future health informatics projects. Students will combine past of current experiences in projects together with insights from the course textbook and complimentary readings to develop new understandings and knowledge. In addition, this course is intended to integrate concepts learned in other foundational courses in the Health Informatics programme.

Objectives:

  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of project management principles and practices;
  • Apply basic project management techniques and choose the appropriate project management supporting tools, and;
  • Function effectively on a project team of any size and as a project manager for small to medium sized projects.
Evaluation:

Participation 15%
Individual Assignments 45%
Group Assignment 40%

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MHI2009H

Course Number MHI2009H
Course Name Evaluation Methods for Health Informatics
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly, 3 hours
Semester Offered Fall – Session 1
Instructor David Wiljer
Quynh Pham
Description:
There is little debate that health information systems have transformed clinical practice and the patient experience. Health information systems hold the promise of improving the flow of information, the coordination and integration of services, and the quality and safety of care. These systems, however, are often imperfect solutions implemented in complex environments. The true impact of health information
systems on the health care system still remains relatively unknown. For the many implementations of health information systems, there are relatively few evaluations and a paucity of high quality research studies to assess the impact of health information systems within a wide range of contexts. In addition, the digital landscape is rapidly changing with the emergence of big data and digital tools such as machine learning, process automation, predictive/preventive analytics and artificial intelligence. This course is designed to demystify the evaluation process and give you the tools that you need to build a solid evaluation plan for every new eHealth project that you work on.
Learner Objectives:
Students will enhance their abilities to:

  • Understand the various approaches, tools and techniques used to evaluate health information systems.
  • Appropriately apply evaluation and research tools required to implement an evaluation plan.
  • Formulate and assess the merits of a health information system evaluation plan based on project objectives and goals.
Evaluation:

Study critique (individual) 20%
Case study leadership (group & individual) 15%
Class participation 10%
Final evaluation plan oral (group) 25%
Final evaluation plan written (group) 30%

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MHI2010H

Course Number MHI2010H
Course Name Health Informatics Practicum Extension
Prerequisite MHI2005Y
Delivery Format takes place at placement site
Semester Offered Fall
Instructor Julia Zarb
Description:
The MHI2010H Practicum Extension supports students’ ongoing learning and contribution at practicum placement sites. The course is designed to build on work and reflection to date, as achieved via the MHI2005Y Practicum course.  The Learning Contract, Discussion Board and Journal are repeated elements of that course, and the Practicum Report is a document to be prepared to evaluate both practicum and extension work.  Note: There is one final evaluation due from preceptor.There are no live group workshops for this course, however students are welcome to communicate with Julia Zarb, course instructor, for any reason related to assignments and/or extension experience throughout the duration of the course.
Evaluation:

Revised Preceptor Agreement CR/NCR
Learning Contract CR/NCR
Experiential Learning Journal ongoing
Discussion Board Posts x2 CR/NCR
Journal Summary Paper CR/NCR
Practicum Report CR/NCR
Final Performance Evaluation CR/NCR

MHI2011H

Course Number MHI2011H
Course Name Performance Measurements in Health Care: Theory and Application
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format eMHI:  Modular
MHI:  Modular
Semester Offered Fall – Session 2
Instructor Mark Dobrow
Description:
The goal of the course is to help students gain a better understanding of performance measurement in health care and the importance of health informatics in supporting performance measurement systems. The course will provide an overview of different models for performance measurement, indicator development strategies and a discussion of issues specific to several stakeholder groups.
Objectives:

  1. To understand performance measurement frameworks and models that are currently being applied across the health care system, when and why to implement them (what to measure and why).
  2. To describe different methods for identifying, selecting and validating specific types of performance measures (how to measure).
  3. To become familiar with emerging issues in the calculation, reporting, and uptake of individual components of performance measurement frameworks by a range of stakeholder groups and in a variety of healthcare settings (appropriateness, feasibility, and relevance of measures and frameworks).
Evaluation:

Individual assignment 20%
Individual – article critique 25%
Group project 45%
Group discussion on the class readings 5%
Participation (in weekly classes) 5%

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MHI2012H

Course Number MHI2012H
Course Name Introduction to Big Data for Health
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly, 3 hours
Semester Offered Fall – Session 4
Instructor Dennis Cheung
Laura Rosella
Description:
Introduction to Big Data for Health is a new elective course intended to introduce students to the many types of data and analytical methods now available that will enhance our ability to investigate and explain the health of communities. These include data that are relevant to measurement of the social economic and genetic determinants of health, the quality and outcomes of healthcare programs and healthcare interventions. The quantity and variety of relevant data have increased substantially in the last decade and now include data from: healthcare administration, electronic medical records, diagnostic laboratories, censuses, vital statistics, environmental exposures, disease and device registries,
research data-bases and bio-repositories. To this may be added relevant information extracted from social services, taxation records, education, justice and corrections services. This is a rapidly changing field. The aims of the course are to introduce students to the different types of data, to provide an overview of the different analytical approaches and to assess the potential value of these big data -sets by examining a number of examples of their use.
Learner Objectives:
The aims of the course are to provide students with an overview of the different types of data, the different analytical approaches and to assess the potential value of these big data-sets by examining a number of examples of their use.

  • Taxonomy of health data, characteristics of structured and unstructured health data.
  • The value of individually linked data.
  • Different analytic approaches to ‘wide’ and ‘deep’ data.
  • Data security and privacy, data sharing, de-identification and governance.
  • Working with distributed data networks.
  • Examples of the use of big data in health and healthcare.
  • Examples of the use of big data in policy evaluation.

MHI2013H

Course Number MHI2013H
Course Name Data Visualization in Health Care
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly, 3 hours, online
Semester Offered Fall
Instructor Omid Shabestari
Description:
A picture is worth a thousand words. Shear amount digital information collected in healthcare brings opportunities and challenges at the same time. Decision-makers are challenged to take timely actions with this data yet are not equipped with required tools to help them in this process. Proper visualization of data empowers them in this task.In this course, we will introduce the foundation concepts of data visualization such as proper use of different graphs. The course will cover the complete life-cycle of data visualization including requirement analysis, data preparation, graphing, validation and sustainability plan.We also cover both best practices and latest trends such as interactivity, story-telling and visual analytics that currently drive the demand in the market. It will include hands-on exercises using the best BI tools as identified by the Gartner’s Magic Quadrant and group activities to augment kinesthetic learning.
Learner Objectives:
After successful completion of this course, the students will be able to identify the requirements for answering a specific question in healthcare, graphically representing the evidence with a proposed action plan in an engaging story-based format that is simple, appealing, timely and sustainable to derive best decisions.

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MHI2015Y

Course Number MHI2015Y
Course Name Health Informatics Project
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Working sessions and small group meetings
Semester Offered Full year (year 1: EMHI)
Instructor Julia Zarb
Description:
The Health Informatics Project course is designed on a consulting model to develop and deliver a project into each student’s place of employment. Healthcare leaders work alongside the instructor to mentor students in project development prior to onsite execution. The course requires approximately 400 hours of applied practice in a work setting and represents 1.5 credits in the MHI degree.
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MHI2016H

Course Number MHI2016H
Course Name Health Informatics Project Extension
Prerequisite MHI2015Y
Delivery Format
Semester Offered Fall
Instructor Julia Zarb
Description:
The MHI2016H Project Extension supports students’ ongoing learning and contribution at employer sites. The course is designed to build on work and reflection to date, as achieved via the MHI2015Y HI Project course.  Note: There is one final evaluation due from supervisor/employer, and no interim report is required.There are no group workshops for this course, however students are invited to communicate with Julia Zarb, course instructor, via live or phone meetings. Ideally, students will set one meeting with the instructor for at least 30 minutes over the course of the term.
Evaluation:

Revised Project Agreement CR/NCR
Learning Contract CR/NCR
Experiential Learning Journal ongoing
Discussion Board posts x2 CR/NCR
Journal Summary Paper CR/NCR
Project Report CR/NCR
Webinar Report (optional) CR/NCR
Final Performance Evaluation CR/NCR

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MHI2017H

Course Number MHI2017H
Course Name System Design & Process Innovation in Healthcare
Prerequisite see below.
Delivery Format EMHI – Modular
MHI – Weekly
Semester Offered Fall – Session 1
Instructor Alexei Lapouchnian
Description:
There are numerous ways in which information technology can be used in any particular setting, with very different results. IT can be used to reduce costs and improve efficiency simply by taking advantage of the power of automation. But the increasingly diverse capabilities of IT systems can also stimulate innovative rethinking of business processes, reorganizing and simplifying work relationships and roles.
Even more radically, strategic use of IT can lead to transformations in entire industries, changing the rules and business models within which customers, suppliers, partners and other stakeholders operate.In the information systems world, the systems analyst acts as the intermediary between technical system developers on the one hand, and business managers and users on the other. Techniques have been developed to enable them to analyze business situations and communicate requirements to technical developers. With the rapidly changing role of IT in today’s organizations, there is also need to rethink the methods and techniques used in systems analysis. This course will cover conventional systems analysis methods as well as recent developments. Modelling approaches considered will include process modelling, data modelling, object modelling, strategic modelling, and value network modelling.
Strengths and limitations of various techniques will be examined.
Learner Objectives:
At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • describe and explain the activities and contexts of systems analysis.
  • describe the changing nature of systems analysis, where information systems can be used to achieve varying degrees of change to existing processes.
  • approach an organization to study its activities and processes from the perspective of systems analysis.
  • map processes using modelling techniques for analysis.
  • analyze the processes and data in an organization, and to explore alternative options for redesigning or improving processes, taking advantage of information technology systems.
  • use modelling techniques to explore more fundamental changes, including those involving reconfigurations of relationships among stakeholders inside and outside the organization.
  • discuss the strengths and limitations of various techniques for systems analysis.
Evaluation:

Assignment 1: Initial exploratory study; process modeling (Individual work) 5%
Assignment 2: (Teamwork)
Process automation and innovation; process and data modelling
30%
Assignment 3: (Teamwork)
Exploring transformations; strategic modelling and goal models
30%
Project Final Presentation (Teamwork) 15%
Participation, in-class and online and peer evaluations (Individual) 5%
Prerequisite:
There are no formal course prerequisites. However, course assignments require:

  • a basic understanding of the major elements of Canada’s health care system
  • an awareness of major trends and issues (see Learning Resources below)
  • a developed ability to read and use course materials and other sources to research and write graduate-level, analytic assignments
  • developed English language (reading and writing) abilities

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MHI2018H

Course Number MHI2018H
Course Name Knowledge Management and Systems
Prerequisite
Delivery Format Modular
Semester Offered Winter – Session 2
Instructor Benjamin King
Karim Keshavjee
Description:
Health informatics professionals are increasingly called upon to help manage knowledge in organizations, beyond conventional information processing. A wide range of information technologies, such as collaboration and social software, enterprise repositories, knowledge-based or expert systems, software agents, as well as traditional information systems, are being used to support work in organizations. This course examines knowledge management from a health system perspective. Notions of knowledge in the management literature and in the information systems area are reviewed. Modelling techniques that can be used during systems analysis in the context of organizational knowledge management are examined.
The course aims to expose students to the issues of knowledge management in health organization and across health systems, and to provide opportunities to learn and apply modelling and analytical techniques to understand the use of various types of information technologies in meeting organizational knowledge management needs.
Learner Objectives:
At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Analyze and identify knowledge management needs in health settings
  • Apply modeling techniques to analyze organizational processes from a knowledge management perspective as well as information systems perspective
  • Analyze and identify potential IT systems solutions to address knowledge management needs
  • Explain and illustrate potential application of ontologies in the context of knowledge management
  • Describe and explain knowledge management concepts in relation to the application of information technologies in the health system
  • Apply an integrated framework to analyze knowledge management across policy, interoperability and technology domains
  • Identify key stakeholders in the system and describe their unique and common knowledge management needs
Evaluation:

Individual Assignment #1 10%
Group Assignment #1 10%
Individual Assignment #2 20%
Individual Assignment #3 30%
Group Assignment #2 30%

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MHI3000H-F3

Course Number MHI3000H-F3
Course Name Interoperability Standards in Health Informatics
Prerequisite n/a
Delivery Format Weekly, 2 hours
Semester Offered Fall – Session 4
Instructor Dennis Cheung
Description:
This course provides students with an introduction to the various interoperability standards available and in use throughout the health informatics community. This course is intended to give students the grounding principles behind how data is exchanged, linked, and integrated across various healthcare information systems and provide students insight into the inner workings of electronic health records (EHR’s).This course is intended to prepare students to participate in, contribute to, lead, and succeed in future health informatics projects. Students will combine past or current experiences in projects together with insights from the course readings to develop new understandings and knowledge. In addition, this course is intended to integrate concepts learned in other foundational courses in the Health Informatics program to enhance the students understanding of EHRs.
Objectives:
The aim of the course is to prepare students to participate in, contribute to, lead, and succeed in future health informatics projects.

  • Demonstrate working knowledge and understanding of the various interoperability standards present in health informatics (i.e. HL7, SNOMED-CT, LONIC, ICD-10-CA, DICOM, etc.)
  • Awareness of the various standards organizations and initiatives (i.e. CIHI, Canada Health Infoway, etc…)
  • Gain awareness of the challenges and obstacles that exist in the implementation of EHRs
  • Understanding of the standards and software development life-cycle
  • Knowledge of Governance Models, decision making processes, and stakeholder engagement activities related to the development of interoperability standards
  • Gain a basic understanding of architecture and why standards play a major role in planning/ implementation activities
  • Ability to apply the correct standards to the development and procurement of health information applications and systems
  • Promote the enabling of data exchange and linkage of data across various data holdings

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