Emily Seto

Professional Engineer
PhD (University of Toronto)
MSc (University of Toronto)
BAS (University of Toronto)

Professional Interests

Health informatics and e-health, health research methods, self-care, clinical decision support, chronic diseases, telemonitoring, healthcare technology evaluation, healthcare human factors, clinical effectiveness (healthcare costs, quality of life)

Impact

1) The main objective of my research is to ultimately improve patient outcomes and quality of life.  Some of this research is finally bridging the gap between research and operationalization to improve patients’ lives.  For example, after technology development and a randomized controlled trial was conducted, a heart failure telemonitoring program will be implemented at the Heart Function Clinic at the University Health Network.

2) Our research group has been very active in supervising students for their theses and internships.  The students get exposed to the design, development, evaluation, and implementation process of eHealth tools. I believe this will enable them to acquire the skillset and experience to be healthcare professionals who will take part in transforming our healthcare system.

3) Even with a well designed and theoretically beneficial eHealth tool, the success of implementing health technology is highly dependent on external factors, such as human resources available, clinical workflow, policy, reimbursement strategies, incentives, healthcare model for implementation (eg, primary care, specialist care, home care), patient characteristics, etc.  Through collaborations with industry, healthcare organizations, government, agencies, and healthcare professionals, my work in past and current studies into these aspects of implementation has provided insight into the challenges and opportunities for successful operationalization of eHealth tools.

Other Affiliations

Centre for Global eHealth Innovation, University Health Network
http://ehealthinnovation.org/

Techna Institute
http://technainstitute.com/

Publications

PubMed